Britain's oldest sociology journal

The Sociological Review has been publishing high quality and innovative articles for over 100 years. During this time we have steadfastly remained a general sociological journal, selecting papers of immediate and lasting significance.

The journal has always been remarkable for the range of interests covered: its topics have included Northern Ireland, Iraq, Scottish prisons, the Hebrides and even the first British supermarkets. It has brought first news of working class affluence, agricultural labour, community, welfare, schooling, youth, sport, environmentalism and feminism as well as intimations of post-modernity.

SR introduced readers to the sociological dimensions of unlikely subjects such as fairy tales, pilfering, monarchy, motorcars, flying saucers, fruit machines, phrenology and the novels of John Berger. A short story was even published in the 1980s.

Today, with this history and an archive of thousands of articles, we publish a quarterly journal as well as special issues and our monograph series. Never sectarian and always true to the journal’s pioneering origins, the current editors cross disciplinary borders into anthropology, economics and politics. We have a five-year impact factor (2012) of 1.220 and the journal has received 2,712 citations since 2004 from 463 contributors, an average of 5.86 citations per contribution.

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