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Mythology, Performativity, and Moral Panic: The Case of Norwegian Black Metal

By Lucy Weir The legacy of the Satanic panic is etched upon the histories of popular and underground cultures alike. Decades after lurid accounts of ritualised abuse, violence and murder were resoundingly discredited, concern for the safeguarding of children and young people still readily slips into histrionic indictments of malevolent forces at work, encompassing such […]

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Featured

Warning! the Times We Knew Were Coming Are Here

Brexit and Trump have made clear that we are in the beginning of a battle that is about life itself.

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The Future of Class Sociology Also Lies in the Past

By Kobe De Keere “Middle-class mafia, more like it” exclaims Irie when she finds out that two middle class women, one is her Cambridge educated surrogate mother and the other a medical doctor, secretly make a psychological diagnoses of her friend without actually consulting either of them. Irie is a character out of the brilliantly […]

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Featured Paper: Re-describing Islamophobia in a Language of Anti-racism

Our Featured Paper section celebrates an excellent paper from the journal by hosting a blog post from the authors, alongside responses.

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Islamophobia as a Form of Racism: A Response

A response to our featured paper: Re-describing Islamophobia in a language of anti-racism

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Podcasts

Bauman and Contemporary Sociology – an interview with Ali Rattansi

Bauman and contemporary sociology – Mark Carrigan interviews Ali Rattansi about his book, ‘Bauman and contemporary sociology: a critical analysis’.

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Event Reports

Gendering Resistance: Multiple Faces of Kurdish Women’s Resistance

By Nisa Göksel On March 14-17, thanks to the support of Sociological Review, I had the opportunity to attend the annual conference of the Eastern Sociological Society at the Boston Park Plaza in Boston, U.S. The conference’s main theme was “Facts and Fictions: Narratives of Inequality and Difference.” There were more than 300 panels and […]

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Self-Harm

The Need to ‘Do Something’

By Akiko Hart And here we are: yet again, the need to ‘do something’, anything, about social media and self-harm. The latest furore, borne of the tragic suicide of Molly Russell, is part of a longer tirade against social media and against self-harm, by people who don’t understand either and would take them away from […]

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Hitting The ‘Glass Wall’: On Age and Inequality in the Cultural Industries

By Sven Brodmerkel and Richie Barker Many segments of the Cultural and Creative Industries (CCI) are characterised by extraordinarily skewed age profiles. For example, a recent survey of 15 leading Australian advertising agencies revealed that 62 per cent of their employees were under 35 years old, and just 10 per cent were older than 45 years. These […]

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Self-Harm

Acceptance and Constraint – Contemporary Perspectives of Self-Harm on Locked Wards

By Rebecca Fish I began researching experiences of self-harm when I was working at an NHS inpatient unit for people with learning disabilities. In 2000, I embarked on an NHS funded long-term research study with my colleague, Helen Duperouzel, exploring understandings of self-harm from the perspective of care staff and the people detained in the unit. In […]

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Behind the scenes of Place revisited: class, stigma and urban restructuring in the case of Glasgow’s Commonwealth Games

By Kirsteen Paton, Vikki McCall and Gerry Mooney Our article was based upon our Beyond Stigma: Exploring Everyday lives in the East End of Glasgow and the CWG2014 research which recorded the local lived experiences of the Commonwealth Games (CWG), as it happened, for residents in the East End of Glasgow. In terms of scale of insight, for […]

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Self-Harm

The History of the Contagion Hypothesis

By Sarah Chaney Whenever I’ve given a talk about the history of self-harm, someone asks the question, “But what about young people on the internet?” This often follows acknowledgment that self-injury – as an act and an understanding of or attitude towards an act – is contextual and historical. Yet somehow, the questioner implies, where […]

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Self-Harm

How Might a Social Media Crackdown on Self Harm Content Actually Work?

By Mark Brown Social media as means of ordinary people sharing, discussing and meeting others has democratised the web. Anyone can post, respond, distribute anything they want. It has broken down barriers between people and information and made it possible for anyone, anywhere to discuss or learn about anything they want. There are no editors, […]

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The Sociological Review Fellowship 2020: Open for Applications

The Sociological Review is delighted to announce that applications are open for our 2020 Fellowship at Keele University.

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