Day: May 10, 2019

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Blog

Hitting The ‘Glass Wall’: On Age and Inequality in the Cultural Industries

By Sven Brodmerkel and Richie Barker Many segments of the Cultural and Creative Industries (CCI) are characterised by extraordinarily skewed age profiles. For example, a recent survey of 15 leading Australian advertising agencies revealed that 62 per cent of their employees were under 35 years old, and just 10 per cent were older than 45 years. These […]

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Reviews

Book Review: Realising the City edited by Camilla Lewis & Jessica Symons

Review by Sharleen Estampador-Hughson Realising the City: Urban Ethnography in Manchester, edited by Camilla Lewis and Jessica Symons, was published by Manchester University Press in December 2017.   Camilla Lewis is a researcher in the department of Sociology at the University of Manchester. Her interdisciplinary research centres on the themes of ageing, inequalities, housing, belonging and community […]

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Reviews

Book Review: The Fire Now edited by Johnson, Joseph-Salisbury & Kamunge

Review by Sara Salem The Fire Now: Anti-Racist Scholarship in Times of Explicit Racial Violence, edited by Azeezat Johnson, Remi Joseph-Salisbury and Beth Kamunge, was published by Zed Books in November 2018. Remi Joseph-Salisbury is a Presidential Fellow in Ethnicity and Inequalities at the University of Manchester. He is the author of ‘Black Mixed-Race Men’, a […]

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Fiction

Fiction: The Desert

By Carissa Gordon Boy walks.             He walks in the desert beneath the weight of too many books in his backpack. He walks too far in the cold rain to arrive at a bus station full of too many people. Some look dangerous. Some are in danger. Boy’s desert isn’t like others. Boy’s desert is […]

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Blog
Self-Harm

Acceptance and Constraint – Contemporary Perspectives of Self-Harm on Locked Wards

By Rebecca Fish I began researching experiences of self-harm when I was working at an NHS inpatient unit for people with learning disabilities. In 2000, I embarked on an NHS funded long-term research study with my colleague, Helen Duperouzel, exploring understandings of self-harm from the perspective of care staff and the people detained in the unit. In […]

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Blog

Behind the scenes of Place revisited: class, stigma and urban restructuring in the case of Glasgow’s Commonwealth Games

By Kirsteen Paton, Vikki McCall and Gerry Mooney Our article was based upon our Beyond Stigma: Exploring Everyday lives in the East End of Glasgow and the CWG2014 research which recorded the local lived experiences of the Commonwealth Games (CWG), as it happened, for residents in the East End of Glasgow. In terms of scale of insight, for […]

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Blog
Self-Harm

The History of the Contagion Hypothesis

By Sarah Chaney Whenever I’ve given a talk about the history of self-harm, someone asks the question, “But what about young people on the internet?” This often follows acknowledgment that self-injury – as an act and an understanding of or attitude towards an act – is contextual and historical. Yet somehow, the questioner implies, where […]

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Self-Harm

How Might a Social Media Crackdown on Self Harm Content Actually Work?

By Mark Brown Social media as means of ordinary people sharing, discussing and meeting others has democratised the web. Anyone can post, respond, distribute anything they want. It has broken down barriers between people and information and made it possible for anyone, anywhere to discuss or learn about anything they want. There are no editors, […]

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