Day: March 29, 2019

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Political Modernity in the Postcolony: Some Reflections from India’s Adivasi Heartland

By Alf Gunvald Nilsen One of the foundational mythologies of sociological Eurocentrism pivots on the proposition that political modernity originated in the West. On this reading, the democratic nation-state, and institutions such as citizenship and civil society are purely Western achievements that only made their way southwards long after they had been consolidated in the […]

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Zygmunt Bauman

Struggling for the Soul of Sociology: Bauman and Ethnomethodology

By Lisa Morriss and Greg Smith Bauman’s critical assessment of ethnomethodology(EM) was the lead article of the first issue of The Sociological Review of 1973. Its placement perhaps reflected the serious attention British sociologists gave to EM as the newest import from the Land of Sociology. Then as now, The Sociological Review was in the vanguard […]

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Publishing Advice For ECRs: Monographs and Papers

Originally posted Sunday 7th May 2017 Advice from our managing editor Michaela Benson and Manchester University Press editor Tom Dark about publishing sociological monographs and journal articles. This was an early career event organised by The Sociological Review and held at the Manchester Museum on April 28th 2017. Publishing Advice For ECRs: Monographs and Papers

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Theresa May Puts the Egg in Hegemony

By Abby Day Theresa May’s interventions in the so-called Easter-egg-gate, and her ‘Easter Message’, have been widely interpreted as nostalgic, benign, even bland messages of soft nationalism and caring Christianity. They were nothing of the sort. They were deliberately targeted at the kinds of people who will vote for her in the next election: old […]

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Sociology and Social Media: Problems and Prospects

Originally posted 4th December 2017 If social media is here to stay, we urgently need to address what this means for the discipline in a way that extends beyond individualised responses which have heretofore been dominant. The Sociology and Social Media: Problems and Prospects event was a first step towards starting this conversation. If you’re […]

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Street Tests of Driverless Cars: Experiments in Co-Existence, or Displacement?

By Noortje Marres Since early 2016, driverless cars have been tested in city centres across the UK, in London, Milton Keynes, Bristol, and earlier this month, in Coventry. One of the stated objectives of these publicly funded trials is “to understand how people respond to, engage with and accept automated vehicles,” as the project website of […]

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Event Reports

‘Publish or Perish!’

By Fawzia Mazanderani Any aspiring academic has heard, and possibly shuddered, at those words before. And for researchers within the social sciences and humanities, the call to ‘Shut up and Write’ booms all the louder, for writing is tantamount to academic survival and success. Yet the hallways and common rooms of universities worldwide are privy […]

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“It’s Important Not to Be a Climate Change Zealot”: Understanding How Politicians Think & Act on Climate Change

By Rebecca Willis There’s no shortage of accounts of the immense challenges that climate change poses to political and social systems. There is John Urry’s masterful analysis of our society’s dependence on a fossil economy, Tony Giddens’ breathless run-through of the implications of climate for modern political systems, and Nick Stern’s painstaking efforts to analyse the impact of […]

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Interviews

A Conversation with Lisa Adkins and Mike Michael About Social Futures

What can the social sciences contribute to our understanding of the future? Lisa Adkins: In the very broadest of terms the social sciences can contribute an understanding that the future – its form, its texture, its promises, its possibilities, its capacities, its relations to the present and the past – is neither inevitable nor fixed but […]

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Mind the Gaps: Crossing Disciplinary Borders and Into the Future

By Gemma Hughes Crossing the first border: returning to the Academy from the ‘real world’ On embarking on doctoral research (eleven years, two children and one mortgage after my Masters degree) I had relatively few concerns about the disciplinary borders that I have since transgressed. After all, I had already blithely switched disciplines years before […]

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Interviews

A Conversation with Sylvia Walby about Crisis, Brexit and Changes in Gender Regimes

By Ece Kocabicak In your 2011 book, The Future of Feminism, you argue that depending on civil society and policy, the financial crisis of 2008 might initiate a shift either towards social democracy and the democratic regulation of finance, or towards fundamentalism, xenophobia and protectionism. Considering Trump’s electoral achievement in the U.S. and Brexit in […]

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Mind the Trap and Cross the Threshold: An Invitation to ‘Liminology’

By Lambros Fatsis In an era where allusions to “inter-”, “multi-”, “cross-”, and “trans-” disciplinary research have become the buzzwords we lead our scholarly lives by, our position within as well as between academic disciplines is frequently shaken-up; not just as a matter of expediency for demonstrating impact, through joined-up thinking, but also as a […]

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My Academic Diary: A Partial Night in the Life of a T1D Parent

By Amy Levine Friends and family usually send more messages of concern about our proximity to North Korea. The trickle of concern breaks open into a stream and this is one of those times. Yet this time is different because Trump is an untrusted wild card. As my family I make contingency plans about leaving […]

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Journalism in the Anthropocene: Living in Liquid Worlds

By Dominic Hinde “All that is solid melts into air”, wrote Karl Marx in the Communist Manifesto, a line subsequently borrowed as the central frame to Marshall Berman’s later seminal book of the same name on how we experience modernity. The idea of solid turning to liquid as a condition of both modernity and modernisation […]

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Essays

Big Data Sociology: Preparing for the Brave New World

By Hamish Robertson and Joanne Travaglia The emergence of the big data paradigm has taken place over centuries of development, emerging from a variety of pioneering uses into what we now call the information sciences. In addition to its theoretical and technical implications, big data clearly has growing implications for individuals and societies. The current representation of big […]

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