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Self-Harm

The Need to ‘Do Something’

By Akiko Hart And here we are: yet again, the need to ‘do something’, anything, about social media and self-harm. The latest furore, borne of the tragic suicide of Molly Russell, is part of a longer tirade against social media and against self-harm, by people who don’t understand either and would take them away from […]

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How to Witness a True War Story

By Scott Timke In the final section of our special section on Sociology and Fiction, Scott Timcke reflects on the work of Tim O’Brien and what it can tell us about trauma and witnessing. The Things They Carried is a collection of Tim O’Brien’s previously published short stories as well as some new material which serve as a bridges […]

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Showing, not telling: some thoughts on social science and (science) fiction

By Paul Graham Raven In the eleventh part of our special section on Sociology and Fiction, Paul Graham Raven reflects on the resources offered by fiction for the communication of sociological ideas to diverse audiences. Given the venue and topic, I should be probably writing this piece as a sociologist of technology (albeit a predoctoral one), and using the […]

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Uncertainty, Sociology and Fiction

By Miranda Iossifidis In the tenth part of our special section on Sociology and Fiction, Miranda Iossifidis considers what we inevitably leave out of sociological accounts and how fiction might help us to recover it.  I wouldn’t have finished my PhD if it weren’t for fiction. I had to finish in time for my scholarship’s deadline, and I […]

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You wake up and suddenly, a story is right in front of you

By Kip Jones In the eighth part of our special section on Sociology and Fiction, Kip Jones reflects on the pleasures of physical books and our emerging culture of analogue nostalgia. A very formal email from the Editor of the International Encyclopedia of Communication Research Methods greeted me first thing this morning: it’s their pleasure to officially accept my manuscript for […]

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Grand Designs

By Phil Thomas In the penultimate part of our special section on Sociology and Fiction, Phil Thomas experiments with fiction as a method for doing research after the ‘ontological turn’.  Upon our time, a widower there was in rural France, who had strangers crossfingered to claim his home when he died. Neither had squeezed, softly […]

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Sociology is Dead! Long live Sociologies!

By Anne Kerr Special Section on Future Sociologies Sociology is often said to be having a bit of a crisis these days. Whatever we may think of the language of crisis, or the extent of the demise it portends, there is a definite sense amongst many UK sociologists of considerable dismay about the process, not […]

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Reflections on Future Sociologies

By Jack Palmer Special Section on Future Sociologies Since attending the Future Sociologies event in Leeds on 1 July, I have been mulling over two points. The first point is biographical, concerned with my status as a doctoral candidate to whom a future in academic sociology appeals greatly, as well as the institutional constraints that limit […]

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Sympathy for the Neo-Liberal Devil

By Steve Fuller Special Section on the Future of Research Governance Where We Are Now The UK government has asked its Department of Business, Innovation and Skills to make a £450 million cut in its budget for this year (and presumably for the foreseeable future). All state-funded academic activity – both education (‘skills’) and research (‘innovation’) […]

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We Must Revoke Silences and Confront the Clamour of Common Sense

By Nick Emmel Special Section on Future Sociologies As I listened to the speakers at the recent Future Sociologies: Challenges to Practice, Policy and Politics event held Leeds I was reminded of Paulo Friere’s account of the liberatory problem-posing education in Pedagogy of the Oppressed. The next morning, still thinking about the ideas raised, I took my […]

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Brexit

Brexit: How Do We Reimagine?

By David Beer In a recent piece in OpenDemocracy, Mary Fitzgerald suggested that in the wake of the EU referendum it is time to reimagine Europe. This, she argues, requires us to be open in drawing upon a range of perspectives. The current malaise would certainly lend itself to such a rethink. Yet there is an […]

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Brexit

Brexit: Brace yourselves for Rising Racism and Islamophobia

By Sadia Habib The campaign for Britain to Exit (Brexit) from the European Union has now been firmly established as one that promoted racialised rhetoric ruthlessly and without any concern for the consequences. What does this mean for the multicultural conviviality in the postcolonial cities in Britain? Even before the result was declared on Friday, social […]

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Brexit

What After Brexit? We Don’t Know, and If We Did, We Wouldn’t Dare Say

By Jana Bacevic In dark timesWill there also be singing?Yes, there will be singingAbout the dark times. – Bertolt Brecht Sociologists are notoriously bad at prediction. The collapse of the Soviet Union is a good example – not only did no one (or almost no one) predict it would happen, it also challenged social theory’s dearly-held assumptions about […]

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Brexit

Brexit – is this Schrödinger’s neoliberalism?

By Liz Morrish The day after what the BBC has been calling a seismic event is bound to feel rather numbing. Twitter was filled with people saying how their timeline had not prepared them for this. Like me, many were connected to other left-leaning, progressive internationalists, and so had felt entitled to discount what they […]

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Brexit

The Working Class and Vote Leave

By Catherine Price We have voted to leave the European Union and the Brexit side has won. For many working class people this vote was about more than the European Union. It was a chance to be heard when their voices had been lost. For me as a PhD student at university, I was torn […]

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