sociology

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Zygmunt Bauman

Struggling for the Soul of Sociology: Bauman and Ethnomethodology

By Lisa Morriss and Greg Smith Bauman’s critical assessment of ethnomethodology(EM) was the lead article of the first issue of The Sociological Review of 1973. Its placement perhaps reflected the serious attention British sociologists gave to EM as the newest import from the Land of Sociology. Then as now, The Sociological Review was in the vanguard […]

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Blog

Epistemic Reflexivity and the Spotless Sociologist (Notes for Reinventing a Rounder Wheel)

By Mario Trifuoggi The industrialisation of academic publishing is one outcome of global educational expansion which criticism cannot pass over the wider discourse on the production of knowledge under capitalism. Whether the latter, especially in its current neoliberal fashion, is empowering or bridling intellectual freedom, it is a very complex matter with multiple aspects to […]

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Events

Relations and Dependencies: Disciplinary Knots

The second Helsinki Knots Symposium, our first ever European conference, took place in October 2015 at the University of Helsinki. The conference explored how the two disciplines so central to our journal, Anthropology and Sociology, deal with the interplay between the intellectual and political/economic conditions of their existence. In the process, it also looked at the overlaps […]

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Events

Sociology in and through the Global South

Time: 1:30pm – 5:00pm, Monday 7th March, 2016 Location: Senate House, London If C. Wright Mills was correct in stating that the pivot of the sociological imagination is the imaginative capacity to join the dots between structure and historical process on the one hand and agency and individual biographies on the other hand, it is also correct […]

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Blog

The Elephant is the Room: Sociology and Architecture

By Adam Wood Sociological explorations of architecture tend to be incursions – sporadic, occasional papers or contextualising features of ethnographies. There are some recent attempts to counter that trend, often outside of the English language [1]. In general, however, whereas sociology’s spatial domain has been an abstracted space or suffered a ‘long term lack of attention’ or […]

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What Works of Sociology and Anthropology Should All Students Read?

What works of Sociology and Anthropology should all students read? Originally posted 8th January 2017.

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Blog

Some Thoughts on ‘Sociological Fiction’

By Ashleigh Watson In the seventh part of our special section on Sociology and Fiction, Ashleigh Watson reflects on the unusual status of her doctoral research and addresses the theoretical questions posed by a project which is both fiction and sociology.  Sociology has a long, well-documented history. Developing through the Enlightenment, the Scientific and Industrial Revolutions, and Romantic and […]

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What is the Biggest Challenge Facing Sociology Today?

What is the biggest challenge facing Sociology today? Originally posted 6th November 2016.

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Podcasts

Biosocial Matters: Rethinking the Sociology-Biology Relations in the Twenty-First Century

Following the launch of our most recent monograph, Biosocial Matters, our Digital Fellow Mark Carrigan spoke to joint editor Maurizio Meloni about the transformation of the relationship between Sociology and Biology and what this means for the social sciences and social life more broadly. Originally posted 15th June 2016.

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Blog

Searching for a Sociological Sensibility

By Keith Kahn-Harris In a post on the Sociological Imagination blog, in the context of discussing my experiences as a sociologist working partly-in and partly-out of academia, I raised the following questions: Is there a sociological sensibility whose presence can make someone a sociologist without reference to what other sociologists write? Is there a bedrock on which […]

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Essays

Sociology’s Dual Horizons

We already know that sociology faces lots of challenges – we might even be a little jaded by such observations. It may offer a little comfort to remind ourselves that we are not alone. All disciplines are being corralled, pushed, pulled and cajoled by the systems of measurement that now act upon them. The conditions […]

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