Sociology of Brexit

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Brexit

Brexit: How Do We Reimagine?

By David Beer In a recent piece in OpenDemocracy, Mary Fitzgerald suggested that in the wake of the EU referendum it is time to reimagine Europe. This, she argues, requires us to be open in drawing upon a range of perspectives. The current malaise would certainly lend itself to such a rethink. Yet there is an […]

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Brexit

Broken Utopia: Britain’s Young People After the Referendum

By Benjamin Bowman The situation for young people in the UK was tough already, before the Referendum. To quote one young participant I spoke to in the course of my research, it’s about communities needing investment and being told “well, we haven’t got the money”. Austerity has had a deep effect on young people who […]

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Brexit

Brexit and the Necessity of Knowing Europe

By Lorenza Antonucci If you are looking for a fresh perspective out of the trite arguments put forward during the post-referendum debate, it is time to pay attention to what happens in (the rest of) Europe. Paradoxically, this is the only way to truly understand Brexit. Will Davies wrote an excellent piece on the sociology of […]

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Brexit

Thinking and Acting Sociologically After Brexit

By Lambros Fatsis In the wake of Brexit, the country has experienced a radical shake-up which revealed what happens when sharp social divisions are allowed to fester uncontrollably for far too long. Such cleavages in society may lurk quietly in the background, or even pass unnoticed for a while, but soon enough become impossible to […]

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2016 US Election
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Brexit
Podcasts

From the UK Referendum to the US Election: Class, Race and History

In this podcast our Digital Fellow Mark Carrigan speaks to Gurminder K. Bhambra about the common threads uniting the UK referendum and the US election: Originally posted 9th December 2016

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2016 US Election
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Brexit

Class Analysis in the Age of Trump (and Brexit): The Pernicious New Politics of Identity

By Gurminder K Bhambra Class has come increasingly to the fore in explanations of outcomes of the UK referendum on leaving the EU and the US Presidential election. Much of this commentary has been prefaced with a criticism of the privileging of identity politics over socio-economic inequality. As a consequence, the white working class, the […]

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2016 US Election
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Brexit

Trump, Brexit and the Twilight of Neoliberalism

By Laurence Cox and Alf Gunvald Nilsen Something remarkable has happened in the Anglophone countries where neoliberalism first came to power. After over two decades of popular resistance to trade deals, from the Zapatistas’ 1994 rebellion against NAFTA and the 1999 Seattle WTO summit protest, the US has elected a candidate openly opposed to such […]

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2016 US Election
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Brexit

Does the Election of Donald Trump Signal a Crisis in World Politics?

By Tracy Shildrick For many the vote by the UK to leave the EU was seriously unsettling, if not shocking and even devastating. The election of Donald Trump in the United States was an even bigger international earthquake. Many, included me, are still reeling, trying to process the magnitude of these two important votes and […]

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Brexit

A Tale of Two Referenda

By Michaela Benson and Dimitrios Theodossopoulos This time last year, Greece geared up for its referendum on whether to accept the latest bailout offered by the European Union; indignation with the punitive actions of the EU that were holding Greece and its people to ransom fuelled solidarity within the nation-state and support from across Europe, […]

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Interviews

A Conversation with Sylvia Walby about Crisis, Brexit and Changes in Gender Regimes

By Ece Kocabicak In your 2011 book, The Future of Feminism, you argue that depending on civil society and policy, the financial crisis of 2008 might initiate a shift either towards social democracy and the democratic regulation of finance, or towards fundamentalism, xenophobia and protectionism. Considering Trump’s electoral achievement in the U.S. and Brexit in […]

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Brexit

Brexit, Bins and Blaming the Victim: UK Debates on Immigration and Integration

By Naaz Rashid Last week a rather irate Polish friend told me how he’d set his alarm for 6.00 am on his day off to put his rubbish out. His local authority doesn’t provide wheelie bins and he was fed up of the local foxes ripping his bin bags to shreds and scattering rubbish everywhere, […]

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Brexit
Videocasts

Videocasts: the Sociology of Brexit

By Chris Moreh The referendum on the United Kingdom’s continued membership of the European Union is a political event of great social significance, yet sociological research has not engaged with the question in any depth. This seminar series attempts to fill this gap by ‘thinking sociologically’ about the observable and (un)expected consequences of a radically […]

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Events

The Spectre of Brexit: Free Movement and European Citizenship in Question

Time: 9:00am – 5:00pm, Friday 17th June, 2016 Location: Southampton University The upcoming referendum on whether the United Kingdom should remain a member of the European Union is one of great social significance, yet sociological research has not engaged with the question in any depth. This one-day seminar attempts to fill this gap by debating the observable […]

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Events

The legacy of Brexit: Mobility and Citizenship in Times of Uncertainty

Time: 9:00am – 6:00pm, Friday 31st March, 2017 Location: University of Southampton Part of the Sociological Review Research Seminar Series A sociology of ‘Brexit’: citizenship, belonging and mobility in the context of the British referendum on EU membership. Funded by The Sociological Review Foundation Keynote speaker: George Szirtes (Poet and translator)Dr Bridget Byrne (The University of Manchester) Following the Brexit vote, the […]

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Brexit

EU Migrants: Differences, Inequalities and Distinctions

By Simone Varriale ‘He [a colleague] used to call me ‘spaghetto’, once, twice, three times, four times, then I told him to stop […] I mean, ‘spaghetto’, I can take it once, twice, but we aren’t friends, we haven’t even had lunch together, or a coffee or something, how dare you […]’ Giacomo (37, Italian, housekeeper […]

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