sociology and fiction

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A mere literary woman: on illegitimate texts

By Katie Collins In the twelfth part of our special section on Sociology and Fiction, Katie Collins reflects on the transgressive nature of Social Science Fiction.  I’m doing a creative writing workshop at the moment, and while my fellow writers intrigue me with the fragments of fictional lives they create from the brief prompts, all I can […]

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Showing, not telling: some thoughts on social science and (science) fiction

By Paul Graham Raven In the eleventh part of our special section on Sociology and Fiction, Paul Graham Raven reflects on the resources offered by fiction for the communication of sociological ideas to diverse audiences. Given the venue and topic, I should be probably writing this piece as a sociologist of technology (albeit a predoctoral one), and using the […]

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Uncertainty, Sociology and Fiction

By Miranda Iossifidis In the tenth part of our special section on Sociology and Fiction, Miranda Iossifidis considers what we inevitably leave out of sociological accounts and how fiction might help us to recover it.  I wouldn’t have finished my PhD if it weren’t for fiction. I had to finish in time for my scholarship’s deadline, and I […]

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You wake up and suddenly, a story is right in front of you

By Kip Jones In the eighth part of our special section on Sociology and Fiction, Kip Jones reflects on the pleasures of physical books and our emerging culture of analogue nostalgia. A very formal email from the Editor of the International Encyclopedia of Communication Research Methods greeted me first thing this morning: it’s their pleasure to officially accept my manuscript for […]

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Grand Designs

By Phil Thomas In the penultimate part of our special section on Sociology and Fiction, Phil Thomas experiments with fiction as a method for doing research after the ‘ontological turn’.  Upon our time, a widower there was in rural France, who had strangers crossfingered to claim his home when he died. Neither had squeezed, softly […]

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Imagining Futures: From Sociology of the Future to Future Fictions

By Richard Tutton In the first part of our special section on Sociology and Fiction, Richard Tutton from Lancaster University explores the significance of fictional futures for Sociological engagements with possible futures. Since the early twentieth century, sociologists, especially those seeking to challenge the orthodoxies of their time have found fiction to be an effective way to imagine radically […]

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The Future Perfect

By Greg Goldberg and Robyn Autry In the second part of our special section on Sociology and Fiction, Greg Goldberg and Robyn Autry from Wesleyan University reflect on an innovative course they ran which sought to bridge the methodological gap between the social sciences and the humanities.  Sociology is typically preoccupied with the present and, […]

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Interviews

Writing Fiction and Writing Social Science

In the third part of our special section on Sociology and Fiction, Rob Kitchin talks to our Digital Fellow Mark Carrigan about scholarly writing, fictional writing and the relationship between them.  Have you always written fiction? Or is it something that began once you were an established academic writer?  I wrote my first novel when I was twenty one.  I […]

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Telling stories to help understand what sociology is about

By Claudia Vallve In the ninth part of our special section on Sociology and Fiction, Claudia Vallve considers the power of stories for making Sociology accessible. I love story telling. I love hiking too. This is a story about hiking and, also, about telling stories about society. As I said, I love hiking. And I’m fortunate to live […]

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Interviews

Writing Fiction as a Sociologist: an Interview with Ann Oakley

When did you begin writing fiction? I have always written fiction, beginning as a small child. I wrote little stories and poems as soon as I could write. Small children, of course, don’t understand the difference between writing fiction and writing nonfiction, which makes their narratives particularly charming. As a teenager I published a few […]

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Life Chances: Co-written Re-imagined Welfare Utopias through a Fictional Novel

Debbie Watson, Simon Poulter, Sophie Mellor and Marilyn Howard In the fourth part of our special section on Sociology and Fiction, Debbie Watson, Simon Poulter, Sophie Mellor and Marilyn Howard reflect on their ‘Life Chances’ project: the co-development of a fictional novel with community participants. ‘Life Chances’, a phrase first used by sociologist Max Weber, has been appropriated by recent British […]

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Podcasts

Patricia Leavy on Social Fictions

In the fifth part of our special section on Sociology and Fiction, Patricia Leavy talks to our Digital Fellow Mark Carrigan about sociological writing and her work on social fictions. Originally posted 27th March 2016.

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Liars, Damn Liars, and Sociologists

By Erynn Masi de Casanova In the sixth part of our special section on Sociology and Fiction, Erynn Masi de Casanova reflects on the fictional aspect inherent in social research and how we might negotiate it in a creative and helpful way. We like to draw firm boundaries around things. A bold line usually separates fiction writing and […]

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Some Thoughts on ‘Sociological Fiction’

By Ashleigh Watson In the seventh part of our special section on Sociology and Fiction, Ashleigh Watson reflects on the unusual status of her doctoral research and addresses the theoretical questions posed by a project which is both fiction and sociology.  Sociology has a long, well-documented history. Developing through the Enlightenment, the Scientific and Industrial Revolutions, and Romantic and […]

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