rapid response

archive
Blog
Stating the Sociological

Stating the Sociological: Robin Smith

By Robin Smith The state of sociology: or imagining Sisyphus happy Sociology, once again, finds itself in a hostile environment, with particular forms of Sociology experiencing this hostility more than others. Often the source of the hostility is internal. Sociology, we hear, is a broad church but the congregation remains divided. Externally, sociology continues to […]

Read More
archive
Blog
Stating the Sociological

Stating the Sociological: Des Fitzgerald

By Des Fitzgerald In his contribution to Times Higher Education’s predictably weird set of contributions on ‘the state of sociology,’ Laurie Taylor recounts how, in 1965, he was offered his first lectureship in the discipline having only completed his (funded) MA degree – and in fact with no BA in sociology, let alone a PhD. These […]

Read More
archive
Blog
Stating the Sociological

Stating the Sociological: Gurminder Bhambra

By Gurminder Bhambra Reposted with the kind permission of the British Sociological Association. First appeared online: 8 October 2018. In 1970, CLR James, the Caribbean-born British historian and philosopher, was interviewed by the journal Black Scholar. James is perhaps most well-known for the publication of Black Jacobins, his account of the Haitian Revolution, and Beyond a Boundary, part autobiography, […]

Read More
archive
Blog
Stating the Sociological

Stating the Sociological: Gargi Bhattacharyya

By Gargi Bhattacharyya It might be better not to rise to the bait. But when the playground is chanting ‘your mama smells’ – however silly the taunt, we have to say something. We seem to have moved seamlessly from the aristocratic university of gentleman scholars remaking the manners and enclosed practices of their own kind […]

Read More
archive
Blog
Stating the Sociological

Stating the Sociological: Hannah Jones

By Hannah Jones I can’t speak for the state of sociology everywhere. What I can tell you is that many of the problems that embattle academic sociology in the UK are the same as for all academic disciplines, in the UK and elsewhere. Among these, the present neoliberal underpinning of universities (which older generations of […]

Read More
archive
Blog
Stating the Sociological

Stating the Sociological: Rima Saini

By Rima Saini There were more than a few claims in the Times Higher Education group think article published at the beginning of this month that caught my attention. However, those I have to take issue with are concerns over what has been framed as 1) a methodological impasse within the discipline, and 2) the […]

Read More
archive
Blog
Stating the Sociological

Stating the Sociological: an introduction

By Michaela Benson This autumn marks 10 years of my relationship with the Sociological Review. I remember the day I travelled to Keele University for my interview, the critical interest and enthusiasm with which the interview panel talked with me about my research with British people living in France, the suggestions of new directions I […]

Read More
2016 US Election
archive
Blog

Trump and Liberal Democracy’s Crisis of Knowledge

By Akwugo Emejulu Trump’s presidential campaign and election have confounded those who are supposed to know things. When Trump announced his candidacy, various media pundits dismissed him. When he called Mexican migrants rapists, when he insulted the family of a dead soldier, when it emerged his wife plagiarised a speech by Michelle Obama and when it was […]

Read More
2016 US Election
archive
Blog
Brexit

Class Analysis in the Age of Trump (and Brexit): The Pernicious New Politics of Identity

By Gurminder K Bhambra Class has come increasingly to the fore in explanations of outcomes of the UK referendum on leaving the EU and the US Presidential election. Much of this commentary has been prefaced with a criticism of the privileging of identity politics over socio-economic inequality. As a consequence, the white working class, the […]

Read More
2016 US Election
archive
Blog
Brexit

Trump, Brexit and the Twilight of Neoliberalism

By Laurence Cox and Alf Gunvald Nilsen Something remarkable has happened in the Anglophone countries where neoliberalism first came to power. After over two decades of popular resistance to trade deals, from the Zapatistas’ 1994 rebellion against NAFTA and the 1999 Seattle WTO summit protest, the US has elected a candidate openly opposed to such […]

Read More
2016 US Election
Blog
Brexit

Does the Election of Donald Trump Signal a Crisis in World Politics?

By Tracy Shildrick For many the vote by the UK to leave the EU was seriously unsettling, if not shocking and even devastating. The election of Donald Trump in the United States was an even bigger international earthquake. Many, included me, are still reeling, trying to process the magnitude of these two important votes and […]

Read More
2016 US Election
archive
Blog

Beacons of Hope and Hate from the US Election: People Power’s Capacity to ‘Trump’ Injustice

By Emma Briant An extreme right fringe has influenced American politics for far longer than many care to admit. This ‘shock’ election victory had a very slow creep. Neoliberal hegemony dug in its heels despite the pain of the 2008 financial crisis, repeating that there is still ‘no alternative’. Even moderate reforms such as Obamacare […]

Read More
2016 US Election
archive
Blog

Love Trumps Hate? LGBTQ in the Trump Era

By Kate McNicholas Smith In a period widely celebrated for its queer progress and inclusion, recent years have seen legislative and social change around LGBT rights. In popular culture we have seen new LGBT visibility and, in perhaps the most iconic symbol of social change, we have seen same-sex marriage legalised or soon to be […]

Read More
2016 US Election
archive
Blog

Trump and The Dangerous Rise of Executive Salvation

By Peter Bloom and Carl Rhodes Donald Trump’s election as President of the United States begs a profoundly paradoxical political question. In an election defined by an intense anger at Wall Street and the neoliberal establishment, how did a silver spoon-fed executive emerge as the champion of those ‘folks who feel left out’ by corporate globalisation […]

Read More
2016 US Election
archive
Blog

Bussing with Trump: Listening to Affect

By Karen Soldatic and Kelley Johnson ‘She got in in the big cities. Look it up! She got in the big cities.’ ‘There is red everywhere! Who would vote for Trump? He is racist and sexist. Who would vote for him? OMG everything is red… look at this!’We turn to the Grade 5s (girls, boys, […]

Read More

This site uses cookies to personalise your experience and analyse site usage. See our Cookie Notice for more details.