future sociologies

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Sociology is Dead! Long live Sociologies!

By Anne Kerr Special Section on Future Sociologies Sociology is often said to be having a bit of a crisis these days. Whatever we may think of the language of crisis, or the extent of the demise it portends, there is a definite sense amongst many UK sociologists of considerable dismay about the process, not […]

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Reflections on Future Sociologies

By Jack Palmer Special Section on Future Sociologies Since attending the Future Sociologies event in Leeds on 1 July, I have been mulling over two points. The first point is biographical, concerned with my status as a doctoral candidate to whom a future in academic sociology appeals greatly, as well as the institutional constraints that limit […]

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We Must Revoke Silences and Confront the Clamour of Common Sense

By Nick Emmel Special Section on Future Sociologies As I listened to the speakers at the recent Future Sociologies: Challenges to Practice, Policy and Politics event held Leeds I was reminded of Paulo Friere’s account of the liberatory problem-posing education in Pedagogy of the Oppressed. The next morning, still thinking about the ideas raised, I took my […]

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Interviews

A Conversation with Lisa Adkins and Mike Michael About Social Futures

What can the social sciences contribute to our understanding of the future? Lisa Adkins: In the very broadest of terms the social sciences can contribute an understanding that the future – its form, its texture, its promises, its possibilities, its capacities, its relations to the present and the past – is neither inevitable nor fixed but […]

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Imagining Futures: From Sociology of the Future to Future Fictions

By Richard Tutton In the first part of our special section on Sociology and Fiction, Richard Tutton from Lancaster University explores the significance of fictional futures for Sociological engagements with possible futures. Since the early twentieth century, sociologists, especially those seeking to challenge the orthodoxies of their time have found fiction to be an effective way to imagine radically […]

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Futures Always In Question

By Richard Tutton and Rebecca Coleman The perils of editing a special issue of The Sociological Review called ‘Futures in Question: Theories, Methods, Practices’ have been made all too apparent by the events that have unfolded since we and our contributors submitted the first versions of the articles in late 2015. Our view of what […]

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Podcasts

Investigating Social Futures

In this series of micro-podcasts, our Digital Fellow Mark Carrigan spoke to Rebecca Coleman and Richard Tutton, editors of our special issue Futures In Question. It was recorded at the Paths to Utopia exhibition which took place at Somerset House last summer. Originally posted 26th July 2017.

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The Future Imagination: Going Live, Getting Real, DIY

Special Section on Future Sociologies By Kirsteen Paton Today’s post-crash era of financial capitalism affects everyday life in profound and mundane ways. We are submitted to the logic and language of value, measured by big data, subject to metrics and, under austerity, we are forced to shoulder the problem of public debt, individually. All of […]

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On the side of the powerful: the ‘impact agenda’ & sociology in public

Special Section on Future Sociologies By Les Back Twenty years ago public sociology was something you did in your spare time. Even writing for newspapers or magazines was thought of as an extra-curricula and extra mural pursuit. That all changed as a result of the debate stimulated by Michael Burawoy’s influential Presidential address to the […]

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Podcasts

Sociology As Court Poetry

By Les Back Special Section on Future Sociologies In this podcast Les Back, Professor of Sociology at Goldsmiths, reflects on the Future Sociologies event which took place at the University of Leeds in July 2015. He argues that the discipline risks becoming ‘court poetry’, as the pressure to demonstrate impact by narrow criteria inculcates a similarly narrow orientation […]

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