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Challenging ‘Crime’ and ‘Crime Control’ in Contemporary Europe

By Ana Ballesteros Pena The last 13-16 September 2017, thanks to the support provided by the Sociological Review to Early Career Researchers, I had the opportunity to attend the 17th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology in Cardiff, UK Challenging ‘Crime’ and ‘Crime Control’ in Contemporary Europe. On arrival, I met a colleague who […]

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Launching Our Kick Start Grants Scheme

Originally postd 20th January 2018 As part of its support for early career researchers, The Sociological Review Foundation has allocated an annual budget of £30,000 for ‘kick start’ grants. The scheme is designed to support individuals or small teams of early career researchers pursuing field-based sociological research. We support discrete research projects and/or ‘pump-priming’ activities […]

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The Moral Rhetoric of a Civilized Society

By Susanna Menis This year the annual Socio-Legal Studies Association Conference was organised by the University of Bristol Law School. I was able to attend thanks to the support that the Sociological Review Foundation offers to Early Career Researchers.  The main venue was the breath taking neo-gothic Will Memorial Building. The conference involved a tour […]

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Political Indignation, Protest and Privilege in Brazil

By Andreza Aruska de Souza Santos In the spring of 2017 I had the opportunity to organize a panel in the 1st Congress for the Association of Brazilianists in Europe (ABRE), which took place at the University of Leiden. Brazilian Studies’ conferences are not new and perhaps BRASA is the most known example. Brazilian studies […]

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British Sociological Association Conference 2018: Identity, Community, and Social Solidarity

Newcastle, UK, 10-12 April 2018     The 297-page British Sociological Association 2018 conference programme struck me, being relatively new to such things, as just a little daunting. And while I started to plan my time by cross-referencing the most apparently relevant of the themed conference streams, my partner quickly corrected me. “You’ll need to go through all […]

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Sociology: The Importance of Being…Historical

By Donna Carmichael Memory, my dear Cecily, is the diary that we all carry about with us. Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest In April of this year, I was fortunate to have the opportunity to attend the biennial European Social Science History Conference in Belfast, and present my paper entitled Culture-led Regeneration and the […]

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The Winners of Our First Kick Start Grants Competition

Originally posted 24th July 2018 We’re delighted to announce the winners of our first Kick Start Grants competition. The scheme is designed to support individuals or small teams of early career researchers pursuing field-based sociological research. We’ll hear more about these projects as the year progresses but for now we’re pleased to introduce our first […]

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A future for fishing?

By Carole White Intergenerational perspectives on social (im)mobilities, fishing identities, Brexit and the Sustainable development Goals, at the People and the Sea Conference Questions over the future of the fishing industry and associated communities around the British Isles have come to the fore in the national media over the past couple of years as the […]

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Why Is ‘Mediatization’ Not Enough (For Understanding This ‘Mediated’ World)?

By Zheng Liu One of the buzzwords you could not miss if you were, like me, at the International Communication Association’s 2018 Conference held between 24-28 May in Prague was ‘mediatization’. Other equally popular words or terms included ‘datafication’, ‘algorithm’, ‘fake news’, ‘big data’ and, of course, ‘AI’. In this short essay, I want to […]

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Tween girls’ dressing in Singapore: Aspirations, Allowances and Affiliations

By Bernice Loh My PhD dissertation focused on young Singaporean girls’ cultural identities and practices of girlhood. More specifically, it investigated the ways tween girls in Singapore wanted to dress after adults, and the values and meanings that they attached to their clothes. While girls’ adult-like dressing have been a topic of extensive debate in the West, […]

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A Geographical Gaze At The ‘Migration Crisis’: Refugees’ Squats As Strategies Of Resistance

By Valeria Raimondi From 10th to 14th April 2018, the AAG American Association of Geographers Annual Meeting was held in New Orleans (LA, USA). More than 9,000 scholars representing 90 different countries attended the conference, and around 6,000 papers were presented, covering all the possible fields and topics related to theory, methods, and practice of […]

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Publishing Advice For ECRs: Monographs and Papers

Originally posted Sunday 7th May 2017 Advice from our managing editor Michaela Benson and Manchester University Press editor Tom Dark about publishing sociological monographs and journal articles. This was an early career event organised by The Sociological Review and held at the Manchester Museum on April 28th 2017. Publishing Advice For ECRs: Monographs and Papers

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‘Publish or Perish!’

By Fawzia Mazanderani Any aspiring academic has heard, and possibly shuddered, at those words before. And for researchers within the social sciences and humanities, the call to ‘Shut up and Write’ booms all the louder, for writing is tantamount to academic survival and success. Yet the hallways and common rooms of universities worldwide are privy […]

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Early career planning and the management of the academic self in the neo-liberal university

By John Holmwood Recent changes to higher education in England have been dramatic, especially since the 2011 White Paper, Students at the Heart of the System. This proposed the withdrawal of direct public co-funding of undergraduate degrees in arts, humanities and social sciences and the replacement by student fees (temporarily capped at £9000) underwritten by a publicly […]

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Think Twice, It’s Alright: Reflections on Leaving Academia

By Meritxell Ramírez-i-Ollé I write this blog post moved by a mixture of feelings of rebellion, excitement and thankfulness. I rebel against the sense of urgency, determinism and short-sightedness that has pervaded my short postdoctoral life; I am excited about developing a more creative, unconventional and open-ended career as a sociologist; and I am extremely […]

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