class

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Blog

The Future of Class Sociology Also Lies in the Past

By Kobe De Keere “Middle-class mafia, more like it” exclaims Irie when she finds out that two middle class women, one is her Cambridge educated surrogate mother and the other a medical doctor, secretly make a psychological diagnoses of her friend without actually consulting either of them. Irie is a character out of the brilliantly […]

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Videocasts

Why are conductors usually middle-class men? Questioning authority in classical music

By Anna Bull In my early 20s, after training for 15 years as a classical musician, suddenly I came to a point where I could no longer work under conductors. Something in me had grown increasingly uncomfortable with this mode of human – and gendered – interaction. Years later, carrying out my PhD research into […]

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Blog
Fiction
Structure

Fiction: A Working-Class State of Mind

By Colin Burnett Ah laid the boax ae painkillers alongside the boattle ae Smirnoff vodka oan the coffee table. It doesnae even matter tae me that ma flat is that cauld it wid gee an Eskimo the shivers. Aw ah kin focus oan is the troubling thoats which are circling aroond ma heid like a […]

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2016 US Election
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Brexit
Podcasts

From the UK Referendum to the US Election: Class, Race and History

In this podcast our Digital Fellow Mark Carrigan speaks to Gurminder K. Bhambra about the common threads uniting the UK referendum and the US election: Originally posted 9th December 2016

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2016 US Election
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Blog
Brexit

Class Analysis in the Age of Trump (and Brexit): The Pernicious New Politics of Identity

By Gurminder K Bhambra Class has come increasingly to the fore in explanations of outcomes of the UK referendum on leaving the EU and the US Presidential election. Much of this commentary has been prefaced with a criticism of the privileging of identity politics over socio-economic inequality. As a consequence, the white working class, the […]

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Blog

‘Raging’ Debate Over How To Measure Class But Is Anyone Listening?

By Kevin Ralston Considering medical sociology and public health in the UK Should we employ neo-Marxist theory, neo-Webarian or functionalist theory to conceptualise and position people in a hierarchy reflecting their relative advantage and material circumstances? Should a measure of occupational stratification be continuous, or should it be based on relational categories? These are some of the […]

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Sociological reflections on ‘doing’ aspiration within the psychic landscape of class

What is it like to live in an ‘aspirational’ way? In this paper for The Sociological Review Kim Allen, Research Fellow at Manchester Metropolitan University, explored the social and psychic costs that accompany this classed process. This blog post explains the context of this paper, as well as the broader research trajectory of which it is […]

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Events

The Sociological Review Annual Lecture 2015: Classificatory Struggles: Class, Culture and Inequality in Neoliberal Times

Imogen Tyler gave The Sociological Review Annual Lecture 2015, with Bev Skeggs and Sarah Green acting as respondents. The lecture took place at 5pm on February 20th at the Manchester Museum on Oxford Road in Manchester.  The fate of groups is bound up with the words that designate them (Bourdieu, 1984). This paper begins by arguing […]

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EU Migrants: Differences, Inequalities and Distinctions

By Simone Varriale ‘He [a colleague] used to call me ‘spaghetto’, once, twice, three times, four times, then I told him to stop […] I mean, ‘spaghetto’, I can take it once, twice, but we aren’t friends, we haven’t even had lunch together, or a coffee or something, how dare you […]’ Giacomo (37, Italian, housekeeper […]

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Podcasts

The Sociological Review award for Outstanding Scholarship 2016

We are delighted to announce that The Sociological Review award for Outstanding Scholarship 2016 has been awarded to Val Gillies, Rosalind Edwards, Nicola Horsley for their article ‘Brave New Brains: Sociology, Family and the Politics of Knowledge’. This is an important paper with lessons for both the discipline of sociology and for how we conceptualise […]

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Podcasts

Podcast: Gender and Creative Labour

In this podcast Bridget Conor, Rosalind Gill and Stephanie Taylor discuss their new monograph on Gender and Creative Labour with our digital fellow Mark Carrigan. Their collection explores the paradox presented by the creative industries: ‘cool, creative and egalitarian’ on the one hand, riven by inequalities of class and gender on the other. See here for the full contents of the monograph. Originally posted […]

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Blog
Brexit

Brexit as a Problem for the Sociology of Culture

By Dave O’Brien and Mark Taylor British social science is currently responding to the puzzle of contemporary political events. Most obviously this takes the form of thinking through the vote to leave the EU and the associated rise of reactionary sentiment. There has also been, understandably, a quest to think about the role of social science more generally, in relation […]

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Essays

The Working Class, Middle Class, Assimilation and Convergence

By Fiona Devine This article is part of our Past and present series, in which current scholars look back at earlier works published in the journal. ‘Affluence and the British Class Structure’ by John Goldthorpe and David Lockwood was published in The Sociological Review (SR) in 1963. The paper was and remains one of the most important […]

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Interviews

Working Life Coaching and the Individualization of Class

By Katariina Mäkinen What is working life coaching? What can its growth tell us about the individualization of class? These were the questions addressed by Katariina Mäkinen (University of Helsinki) in a recent paper for The Sociological Review. In this interview, she introduces this work and explains why working life coaching is so significant for life under […]

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