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Event Reports

Intersectionality in the Archive: Power Structures, ‘Absences’ and Partiality in Archival Research

By Hannah Martin The first week in April 2019 saw over 9,000 geographers and social scientists arrive in Washington D.C. for the Annual Meeting of the American Association of Geographers (AAG). Due to the generous support of the Sociological Review Foundation, I was able to attend and present a paper at this internationally renowned conference. […]

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Podcasts

Bird la Bird on queer history, invisibility and playing in the archive

By Mark Carrigan In the first episode of a new cultural podcast from The Sociological Review, we spoke to Queer Femme Feminist Performance Artiste Bird la Bird about queer history, invisibility and playing in the archive. These themes are all addressed in an upcoming project at the V&A: An Armchair tour of the ‘Queer People’s knick knack Emporium’. […]

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Event Reports

Undisciplining the Archive, or, What is Sociology For?

By Lisa Kalayji In an atypically high-spirited opening panel at Undisciplining, panellists and audience members latched onto a catchy phrase from The Sociological Review’s manifesto: ‘demonstrably alive’. It became the unofficial slogan of the conference, closely followed by Michaela Benson’s remark that ‘sociology doesn’t have a monopoly on the sociological’. Delegates and presenters kept returning to these […]

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Events

The Sociological Review and the History of the Discipline

Time: 9:00am – 5:30pm, Thursday 11th October, 2018 Location: Keele University, UK This one-day event intends to raise awareness of the Foundations of British Sociology archive maintained by Keele University. This remarkable resource collects a diverse array of materials from the 1880s to the 1950s, gifted to the university when the Institute of Sociology was dissolved in 1955. ‘Members […]

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Essays

Robert King Merton as Prodigy

By Alan Sica This article is part of our Past and Present series, in which current scholars look back at earlier works published in the journal. Robert K. Merton once remarked on the difference between scholastic interpretation and heuristic value in assessing sociology’s classical thinkers. His influential essay ‘Puritanism, Pietism and Science’ (PPS), showed just […]

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Essays
Zygmunt Bauman

Bauman? On Ethnomethodology?

By Phillip Brooker I would like to acknowledge, with great thanks, the Manchester Ethnomethodology/Wittgenstein reading group, and especially Wil Coleman, Alex Dennis and Wes Sharrock who willingly spent a session indulging me in discussing the article in question. The expert insight they have offered has been hugely appreciated, and I hope the piece that follows […]

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Essays

The Working Class, Middle Class, Assimilation and Convergence

By Fiona Devine This article is part of our Past and present series, in which current scholars look back at earlier works published in the journal. ‘Affluence and the British Class Structure’ by John Goldthorpe and David Lockwood was published in The Sociological Review (SR) in 1963. The paper was and remains one of the most important […]

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Essays

Sociology’s Dual Horizons

We already know that sociology faces lots of challenges – we might even be a little jaded by such observations. It may offer a little comfort to remind ourselves that we are not alone. All disciplines are being corralled, pushed, pulled and cajoled by the systems of measurement that now act upon them. The conditions […]

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