academic labour

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The Irrational Pace of Craft-Time

By Fabian Cannizzo The era of mass higher education is riddled with competing motivations, each shaping academic work and planning. For Blackmore and Kandiko, academic life is an intersection of enjoyment, monetary rewards, and ‘prestige economies’. Affect, capital, and status might be seen to draw the attention of intellectual labourers in different directions. Enjoyment may emerge […]

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Private Troubles, Public Issues

Imposter Syndrome as a Public Feeling

By Maddie Breeze This blog is about trying to re-think ‘imposter syndrome’ in academic labour as a public feeling. I’ve tried to do this by using semi-fictional auto-ethnography – in other words by writing a story, drawing on my experience. ‘Imposter syndrome’ can include the conviction that markers of professional success have been awarded by mistake or achieved […]

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‘You’ve Got to Love What You Do’; ‘Otherwise You’d Be Totally Mad’

By Oili-Helena Ylijoki Passion, love and dedication belong to the core vocabulary of academic culture. In a similar manner as Australian academics in the study of Fabian Cannizzo, the Finnish academics I have interviewed tend to describe their work as a way of life and an inherent part of their personality: “It’s nice to get paid […]

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When Greed Is Good: On Love and Academic Labour

By Mona Mannevuo Fabian Cannizzo’s paper You’ve got to love what you do: academic labour in a culture of authenticity is an important, timely attempt to grasp the problems in academia today by moving beyond the dichotomy of managerial/academic values. The research draws on interviews with Australian academics, so one could argue—as Cannizzo notes—that the findings are […]

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The Love of Labour in Academia

By Fabian Cannizzo Both the spirit and structure of higher education across the globe have been restructured over the last four decades. In “‘You’ve Gotta Love What You Do’: Academic Labour in a Culture of Authenticity”, I attempt to describe how this global restructuring has had very personal impacts for academic labourers and their work […]

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Falling in Love in Academia: A Response to Mona Mannevuo and Oili-Helena Ylijoki

By Fabian Cannizzo I’d like to thank Mona Mannevuo and Oili-Helena Ylijoki for taking time to read and respond to my study of the nostalgic language that characterises accounts of academia, ‘“You’ve got to love what you do”: Academic labour in a culture of authenticity”, in this previous post. I would especially like to thank them […]

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Some Thoughts on ‘Sociological Fiction’

By Ashleigh Watson In the seventh part of our special section on Sociology and Fiction, Ashleigh Watson reflects on the unusual status of her doctoral research and addresses the theoretical questions posed by a project which is both fiction and sociology.  Sociology has a long, well-documented history. Developing through the Enlightenment, the Scientific and Industrial Revolutions, and Romantic and […]

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