Interviews

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Interviews

A Conversation with Lisa Adkins and Mike Michael About Social Futures

What can the social sciences contribute to our understanding of the future? Lisa Adkins: In the very broadest of terms the social sciences can contribute an understanding that the future – its form, its texture, its promises, its possibilities, its capacities, its relations to the present and the past – is neither inevitable nor fixed but […]

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A Conversation with Sylvia Walby about Crisis, Brexit and Changes in Gender Regimes

By Ece Kocabicak In your 2011 book, The Future of Feminism, you argue that depending on civil society and policy, the financial crisis of 2008 might initiate a shift either towards social democracy and the democratic regulation of finance, or towards fundamentalism, xenophobia and protectionism. Considering Trump’s electoral achievement in the U.S. and Brexit in […]

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An Interview with the Winners of our Prize for Outstanding Scholarship 2014

Originally posted 28th February 2016 We announced last month that Bryan S. Turner and Berna Zengin Arslan were the winners of the 2014 Sociological Review Prize for Outstanding Scholarship for their article Legal pluralism and the Sharia: a comparison of Greece and Turkey. See here for past winners, as well as details of the outstanding articles which were included on […]

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Writing Fiction and Writing Social Science

In the third part of our special section on Sociology and Fiction, Rob Kitchin talks to our Digital Fellow Mark Carrigan about scholarly writing, fictional writing and the relationship between them.  Have you always written fiction? Or is it something that began once you were an established academic writer?  I wrote my first novel when I was twenty one.  I […]

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Writing Fiction as a Sociologist: an Interview with Ann Oakley

When did you begin writing fiction? I have always written fiction, beginning as a small child. I wrote little stories and poems as soon as I could write. Small children, of course, don’t understand the difference between writing fiction and writing nonfiction, which makes their narratives particularly charming. As a teenager I published a few […]

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Women’s agency in living apart together: constraint, strategy and vulnerability

In a forthcoming Sociological Review paper Simon Duncan, Emeritus Professor in Comparative Social Policy at the University of Bradford, reports on the findings of a representative survey from Britain in 2011 and follow-up interviews investigating Living Apart Together (LAT) relationships. You can read the paper (currently open access) as an early view online here. In this […]

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Do Those Diagnosed With Alzheimer’s Disease Lose Their Souls? Whitehead and Stengers on Persons, Propositions and the Soul

An interview with Michael Halewood, author of Do Those Diagnosed With Alzheimer’s Disease Lose Their Souls? Whitehead and Stengers on Persons, Propositions and the Soul, shortlisted for The Sociological Review Award for Outstanding Scholarship 2016. What is Alzheimer’s Disease? As soon as you start trying to define Alzheimer’s Disease, you run into problems. If it is classed […]

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Eros in the Field? Bourdieu’s Double Account of Socialized Desire

An interview with Helene Aarseth, author of Eros in the Field? Bourdieu’s Double Account of Socialized Desire, shortlisted for The Sociological Review Award for Outstanding Scholarship 2016. What role did psychoanalytical theory play in Bourdieu’s later works? In his later works Bourdieu draws extensively on psychoanalytic ideas. He talks, for instance, about projections, energies, drives, sublimations, desire […]

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Exploring Micro-Sociality through the Lens of Figurational Dynamics

By Rachel Swann and Gordon Hughes An interview with Rachel Swann and Gordon Hughes, authors of Exploring Micro-Sociality through the Lens of ‘Established-Outsider’ Figurational Dynamics in a South Wales Community, shortlisted for The Sociological Review Award for Outstanding Scholarship 2016. What was The Established and the Outsiders? Rachel: E&O is a seemingly standard community case study of […]

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Charitable Giving and Lay Morality

An interview with Balihar Sanghera, author of Charitable Giving and Lay Morality: Understanding Sympathy, Moral Evaluations and Social Positions, shortlisted for The Sociological Review Award for Outstanding Scholarship 2016. What is lay morality? The term is taken from Andrew Sayer’s work, including his book Why Things Matter to People. It refers to our evaluative relation to the world, […]

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A Small Sociology of Maternal Memory: an Interview with Ann Oakley

An interview with Ann Oakley, author of A small sociology of maternal memory, shortlisted for The Sociological Review Award for Outstanding Scholarship 2016. Why have women’s memories of childbirth been treated as special cases by the sociology of memory? Most sociology has treated women, and the study of women, as a special case. They tend to be […]

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Habitus and Social Science: a Virtual Roundtable

Following our ground-breaking special section on the habitus beyond sociology, published in February this year, we invited some of the contributors to undertake a dialogue for our blog. Elizabeth B. Silva, Helene Aarseth, Sam Friedman, Lynne Layton and Muriel Darmon discuss some of the key issues addressed in the special section. Why is the habitus an important concept for the social sciences? Elizabeth: The […]

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Getting Beyond Bourdieu in the Sociology of Morality

In recent years morality and ethics have returned to the mainstream of Sociology after a long period relegated to the periphery of the discipline. In this interview, following from her recent paper in The Sociological Review, Léna Pellandini-Simányi, Assistant Professor at Eötvös Loránd University, puts these trends in context and offers a nuanced critique of Pierre Bourdieu’s […]

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What is the habitus clivé?

By Sam Friedman While habitus is surely one of the most influential concepts in Sociology today, the related idea of the habitus clivé is less well known. Our editorial board member Sam Friedman, London School of Economics, explains where this concept came from and how his recent research, published in The Sociological Review, indicates that it […]

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Working Life Coaching and the Individualization of Class

By Katariina Mäkinen What is working life coaching? What can its growth tell us about the individualization of class? These were the questions addressed by Katariina Mäkinen (University of Helsinki) in a recent paper for The Sociological Review. In this interview, she introduces this work and explains why working life coaching is so significant for life under […]

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