Visual Sociology

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Visual Sociology

Seeing Domiciliary Care Work. Affects, ethics, materialities.

Chanelle Manton and Patricia Prieto-Blanco In a time of COVID-19 some home spaces have been rendered highly visible/visualized. However, care spaces still go largely unseen in social life, let alone the labour processes carried out within them at both formal and informal levels. Care work in these domiciliary settings is emplaced, practiced and felt, but […]

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Critical reflections on participatory visual methods and voice

Daniel McCulloch Social research sometimes makes commendable, but at times under-evidenced, claims to raise the ‘voices’ of ‘marginal’ groups or individuals. However, it often remains unclear what is meant by voice in such assertions, with voice having numerous possible meanings, as this article explores. Related to this, recent years have seen an explosion in the […]

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Visual Sociology

Book Review: Seeing Politics by Sophie Harman

Review by Dominic Hinde Seeing Politics: film, visual method and international relations by Sophie Harman was published by McGill-Queens University Press in 2019. Sophie Harman is Professor of International Politics at Queen Mary University of London where she teaches and conducts research into Global Health Politics, African agency in International Relations, and Visual Politics. She has […]

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Thinking Sontag Sociologically

Laura Harris ‘The mystery of the world is the visible, not the invisible’ Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray This quip opens Susan Sontag’s seminal essay ‘Against Interpretation’, first published in 1964. The essay, an enduring classic of art writing, considers the prevailing way that art critics made sense of the sensory objects of […]

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4 angles of the Liver building in Liverpool
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Visual Sociology and Urban Icons

Maike Pötschulat Any type of social research risks reiterating what is already known about the social world; getting beyond this is a challenge for us all. Visual methods are by now a mainstream part of qualitative research and offer a lot of potential to generate sociological knowledge by revealing a wider range of standpoints than […]

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Can you draw that for me? Visualizing wayfinding in the age of Google Maps

Rebecca Noone In the early 1960s, artist Stanley Brouwn walked through the streets of Amsterdam asking passers-by for directions. He requested they draw the route with the paper and pen he kept in his pocket. He repeated the interactions collecting line drawings of Amsterdam’s pathways, which he collated in books and presented in galleries under […]

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Visual Sociology

Suspended and immersed: video methods and wild swimming

Charlotte Bates and Kate Moles spend time with wild swimmers in the water.

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Visual Sociology

Graphic Novel Review: Lissa: A Story About Medical Promise, Friendship and Revolution

Review by Karen Throsby The graphic novel Lissa: A Story About Medical Promise, Friendship and Revolution is written by Sherine Hamdy and Coleman Nye and illustrated by Sarula Bao and Caroline Brewer. Sherine Hamdy is an Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Irvine, where she joined the faculty in the Fall of 2017, […]

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Visual Sociology

Spycops Comic

Read Nathan Stephens Griffin’s comic based on research with with environmental activists who have been spied on by undercover police officers.

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Visual Sociology

Introducing the Instagram residency

Paul Sng is in residence on our Instagram this month.

Photo: Bobby Beasley. Taken from the book Invisible Britain: Portraits of Hope and Resilience, edited by Paul Sng

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Visual Sociology

Introduction: Visual Sociology

Our digital platforms are exploring contemporary visual sociology this month. Find out what we’ve got planned. Photo: Bobby Beasley, Invisible Britain, ed. Paul Sng

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