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Featured

Mythology, Performativity, and Moral Panic: The Case of Norwegian Black Metal

By Lucy Weir The legacy of the Satanic panic is etched upon the histories of popular and underground cultures alike. Decades after lurid accounts of ritualised abuse, violence and murder were resoundingly discredited, concern for the safeguarding of children and young people still readily slips into histrionic indictments of malevolent forces at work, encompassing such […]

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Fiction

Fiction: The Nightclub

By Craig Potter The student mingles. At the culmination of each uncomfortable silence, he steps away before greedily edging forwards to drink from another centre of worldly energy. ‘Which hall are you in?’ ‘What are you studying?’ ‘Where did you come from?’ Closed conversation propels him onward. He expects more. All expect more. They came […]

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Featured

Warning! the Times We Knew Were Coming Are Here

Brexit and Trump have made clear that we are in the beginning of a battle that is about life itself.

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Event Reports

Intersectionality in the Archive: Power Structures, ‘Absences’ and Partiality in Archival Research

By Hannah Martin The first week in April 2019 saw over 9,000 geographers and social scientists arrive in Washington D.C. for the Annual Meeting of the American Association of Geographers (AAG). Due to the generous support of the Sociological Review Foundation, I was able to attend and present a paper at this internationally renowned conference. […]

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Reviews

Book Review: Bourdieu: A Critical Introduction by Tony Schirato with Mary Roberts

Review by Andrea Lizama Bourdieu: A critical introduction by Tony Schirato with Mary Roberts was published by Allen & Unwin in April 2018. Tony Schirato was formerly Professor & HOD of Communication at the University of Macau. He researches and writes in the areas of critical theory, gender, cultural politics, and sport. He is currently writing a […]

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The Future of Class Sociology Also Lies in the Past

By Kobe De Keere “Middle-class mafia, more like it” exclaims Irie when she finds out that two middle class women, one is her Cambridge educated surrogate mother and the other a medical doctor, secretly make a psychological diagnoses of her friend without actually consulting either of them. Irie is a character out of the brilliantly […]

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Events

Thinking on the Move: The Possibilities and Problems of Walking Sociologically

The Sociological Review is delighted to bring you a 2-day walking conference organised by Emma Jackson, Mark Carrigan and Les Back.

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Featured Paper: Re-describing Islamophobia in a Language of Anti-racism

Our Featured Paper section celebrates an excellent paper from the journal by hosting a blog post from the authors, alongside responses.

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Islamophobia as a Form of Racism: A Response

A response to our featured paper: Re-describing Islamophobia in a language of anti-racism

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Events

After Progress: Modernity in Ruins (Seminar 1)

This symposium is the first of the After Progress symposium series. Together with fours guest speakers, we will begin to explore collectively how to understand our present as populated by the ruins of the modern idea of progress, and we’ll explore key questions concerning how we might cultivate plural arts of living and flourishing in the ruins.

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Podcasts

Bauman and Contemporary Sociology – an interview with Ali Rattansi

Bauman and contemporary sociology – Mark Carrigan interviews Ali Rattansi about his book, ‘Bauman and contemporary sociology: a critical analysis’.

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Event Reports

Gendering Resistance: Multiple Faces of Kurdish Women’s Resistance

By Nisa Göksel On March 14-17, thanks to the support of Sociological Review, I had the opportunity to attend the annual conference of the Eastern Sociological Society at the Boston Park Plaza in Boston, U.S. The conference’s main theme was “Facts and Fictions: Narratives of Inequality and Difference.” There were more than 300 panels and […]

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Videocasts

Why are conductors usually middle-class men? Questioning authority in classical music

By Anna Bull In my early 20s, after training for 15 years as a classical musician, suddenly I came to a point where I could no longer work under conductors. Something in me had grown increasingly uncomfortable with this mode of human – and gendered – interaction. Years later, carrying out my PhD research into […]

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Self-Harm

The Need to ‘Do Something’

By Akiko Hart And here we are: yet again, the need to ‘do something’, anything, about social media and self-harm. The latest furore, borne of the tragic suicide of Molly Russell, is part of a longer tirade against social media and against self-harm, by people who don’t understand either and would take them away from […]

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