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Event Reports

On Principles for Decolonial research: Reflections on ‘love’ by the ‘colonized colonizer’

By Ahmed Raza Memon The Sociological Research Foundation’s Early Career Workshop with Prof. Linda Tuhiwai Smith made me think about aspects of work that we, as researchers, rarely touch upon, for example love. ‘Not the toxic territorial’ love – as Prof Tuhiwai Smith pointed out – but the one of compassion to those we engage […]

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Event Reports

Decolonising Methodologies – A Review of TSR’s Annual Lecture, 2019

By Carol Ann Dixon The Sociological Review’s Annual Lecture was given by Professor Linda Tuhiwai Smith (University of Waikato, New Zealand). Titled “Decolonising Methodologies: 20 Years On,” the talk featured personal reflections on approaches to undertaking qualitative research, two decades after her internationally-renowned Decolonising Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples (1999) was first published. The lecture […]

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Fiction

Fiction: Karachi

By Shama Dossa ‘Granny’s Theory’ By Zeeshan Sahil Granny says The world is balanced on a cow’s horn. When it gets tired Of carrying the whole world On its horn The cow shifts the world to the other horn. Getting moved From one to the other, For a few minutes. The world is shaken up. […]

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Featured

Connected Sociologies and Getting Out of the Way

Here Yasmin Gunaratnam responds to The Sociological Review’s Annual Lecture 2020 by Linda Tuhiwai Smith.

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Welcome Back

We’re making some changes to how we do online publishing!

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What are you worth? What is your value-in-exchange?

A satirical website exists called humansforsale.com. Asking: Have you been thinking about putting yourself up for sale lately? Ever wonder how much money you could get on the open human market? You are invited to fill out a form assessing your worth, against an array of criteria, including ethnicity; education; income; athletic-ability; weight; and sense […]

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Illusio and gendered marginalisation in DIY punk scenes

Megan Sharp and Steven Threadgold It’s about thresholds, you know? When every day, not just at shows or as a band member or even in any music space, you have to deal with men treating you like you’re incompetent, your threshold for bullshit gets higher and higher. And then these micro-aggressions get less and less […]

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Events

The Visual and Critical Representation in an Age of Impact

Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge Friday 6th March 2020, 9.30am-5.15pm The event has been funded by the Sociological Review Foundation and the Faculty of Education (University of Cambridge) and organised by The Politics of Representation Collective. This seminar engages with the politics of representation in an increasingly accelerated, regulated, metrics-driven, and marketised academic environment […]

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Read the current issue of the Journal

The Sociological Review has been publishing high quality and innovative articles for over 100 years. During this time we have steadfastly remained a journal that pushes the boundaries of sociological enquiry, selecting papers of immediate and lasting significance. Our tradition extends to research that is anthropological or philosophical in orientation and analytical or ethnographic in approach. […]

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‘Always Fighting’

Gareth M. Thomas Why is it so hard to get the resources? You feel like you’re totally up against everybody. The State, the education authorities, whatever. […] It’s just a fight, it’s always fighting. This extract is taken from an interview with David. He is the father of Louis, a 15-year-old boy who has Down’s […]

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Event Reports
Thinking on the Move

Disorientating Responsibly: Reflections from ‘Thinking on the Move’ with Blindfolded Walkers

Harshadha Balasubramanian We made our way down a busy street in East London, processing in pairs, with one member of each pair wearing a blindfold. Every blindfolded walker held the elbow of their partner who, through this physical contact, could serve as a guide. This was the walk I delivered at The Sociological Review’s 2019 […]

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Thinking on the Move

Decomposing and recomposing through street-walking

Sinead Marian D’Silva As I scout for apartments in the ridiculous housing situation in Lisbon, I find myself confronting the awkward layering of the city. Involuntarily I amuse myself by observing the surroundings. At some places the pavements are narrow, while others wider than the road. This is relevant to an avenue I will now […]

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