The Sociological Review Blog

The History of the Contagion Hypothesis

April 2019

Whenever I’ve given a talk about the history of self-harm, someone asks the question, “But what about young people on the internet?” This often follows acknowledgment that self-injury – as an act and an understanding of or attitude towards an act – is contextual and historical. Yet somehow, the questioner implies, where young people and the internet are concerned this does not apply. Why should this be? Young people are no less complex than adults after all. In this blog, I suggest that we need to be careful in making quick assumptions as to what is to ‘blame’ for teen self-harm and suicide, and that while social media may seem like an easy scapegoat, there are also dangers in laying responsibility on online communities, image sharing and the potentially negative effects of teenagers on each other.

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How Might a Social Media Crackdown on Self Harm Content Actually Work?

April 2019

Social media as means of ordinary people sharing, discussing and meeting others has democratised the web. Anyone can post, respond, distribute anything they want. It has broken down barriers between people and information and made it possible for anyone, anywhere to discuss or learn about anything they want. There are no editors, no locked doors. This grand liberation of information has brought both great positives and also created great anxieties as what is online seeps offline, sometimes with fatal results.

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The Sociological Review Fellowship 2020: Open for Applications

April 2019

The Sociological Review is delighted to announce that applications are open for our 2020 Fellowship at Keele University - School of Social Science and Public Policy.

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The Undisciplining Sessions Episode 7: Navigating Higher Education as Working Class Women

April 2019

This episode brings Chantelle Lewis, editorial manager for The Sociological Review, into conversation with Ronda Daniels and Steph Lacey. They talk about their experiences of being young working class women in Higher Education, of becoming aware of their class backgrounds in these spaces. Reflecting on their initial unease in entering and navigating these spaces, they discuss how these institutional spaces are made in the image of young middle-class students and how this disadvantages those from backgrounds where they have not been brought up to know the rules of the game. As they describe their own trajectories in and through the university, they draw out the strategies that they have developed in order to cope in these spaces, and talk about what needs to change in order to support working class students continued engagements with Higher Education.

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What would Ibn Khaldun have made of Silicon Valley?

April 2019

Return to Ibn Khaldun- again; this is the title the contemporary historian of the Middle East and North Africa, Stephen Dale, chose for a review of three recent books on Ibn Khaldun;. This return is indeed a recurring move among intellectuals from places as disparate as Malaysia and Singapore (Farid Alatas), Iran (Javad Tabataba’i) and the US (James Fromherz, and Stephen Dale himself). But not all such returns are the same. My own observation suggests a shift in the discussions about Ibn Khaldun’s legacy from the history departments to the sociology departments, corresponding to a shift from viewing Ibn Khaldun as a historical figure to seeing him as a classic thinker with many useful insights for our century.

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