The Sociological Review Blog

Political Indignation, Protest and Privilege in Brazil

April 2018

In the spring of 2017 I had the opportunity to organize a panel in the 1st Congress for the Association of Brazilianists in Europe (ABRE), which took place at the University of Leiden. Brazilian Studies’ conferences are not new and perhaps BRASA is the most known example. Brazilian studies programmes also exist in different universities across the world and it is not difficult to understand why people are so keen to discuss Brazil. Stephen Zweig, already in the dawn of the 20th century, coined what became a famous saying “Brazil, the country of the future”; many years passed until the ideas discussed in the book seemed to be finally reality, but those days were brief.

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Call for Academic Diary Entries

April 2018

We invite contributions to on our ongoing academic diary series. We welcome short reflections on topical issues for academic life, through the lens of the diary entry, but we're particularly interested in accounts of working life that reveal the day-to-day reality of particular positions within the academy.

Diary entries should be less than 1500 words and submitted to community@thesociologicalreview.com

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Weapons Of The Strike*

April 2018

Between the 22nd February and 16th March 2018, university staff (and students) across the UK took part in the largest strike within UK higher education for decades. Drawn from observations from the picketline, the graphic commentary can only partly capture the emancipatory spontaneity of the moment—the colourful banners and slogans, the music and dancing, the costumes, masks and material culture, testament to the creativity of all those participating. Just one of the creative outputs of the strike, the commentary plays a small part in revealing the action as a profoundly educational experience through which creativity, imagination and performance emerge through solidarity to produce the vision of a different future.

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Revisions Required

April 2018

“Revisions required.” While this phrase can bring some forlorn moments, it offers hope and opportunity to fix known and previously unknown errors. This is the assessment I would give myself after completing my first year on the tenure-track at The University of The West Indies, St. Augustine. While 2016/2017 was in some ways ‘a good year,’ (I began said tenure track position and my first book was published) nevertheless I made plenty of mistakes especially when it came to points of departure with established senior colleagues. I am almost certain that many of these mistakes are common for new hires, and perhaps especially acute when navigating the transition from one academic culture to another. Still, in the spirit of learning, the goal is not to repeat them. And so I am implementing revisions.

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It’s Not Something You Can Just Share on Facebook. On the Difficulty of Talking About Childhood Sexual Abuse

April 2018

I have found it almost overwhelmingly difficult to write/speak the sentence ‘I was sexually abused as a child’. But why, in a societal atmosphere in which ‘abuse’ now makes frequent appearances in the mainstream media, and in which others have also begun to voice, publicly, assaults that were previously unspeakable (for example, #metoo), does it remain so difficult to ‘tell’?

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