The Sociological Review Blog

The Undisciplining Sessions: Episode 3: Decolonisation and anti-racist solidarity within and beyond the University

February 2019

What should anti-racist solidarity within and beyond the university look like? In this episode, Chantelle Lewis, editorial manager at The Sociological Review, Adam Elliott-Cooper (Kings College London) and Remi Joseph-Salisbury (University of Manchester) discuss the challenges of doing anti-racist work within and beyond the university. They talk about how to build solidarities that weave together understandings of inter-personal and institutional racisms, while also attending to the anti-racist struggles ongoing internationally. And within this, they call for understandings of racism centred on the relationship of capitalism and imperialism.

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“Serenity Now!” Emotion Management and Solidarity in the Workplace

February 2019

Why are employers so interested in resilience training these days? And who benefits from workers’ emotion management strategies? Perhaps more importantly: what do these questions have in common? In our new article ‘Emotion management and solidarity in the workplace: A call for a new research agenda’ in The Sociological Review, we propose a few ways to think about the challenge of managing emotions at work.

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‘It all depends on where you look from, where you stand’

February 2019

2018 was the year to visit Newcastle, by all accounts with Rough Guides naming it the best place in the world to visit, mainly as a result of the city hosting a number of events and installations linked to the Great Exhibition of the North (GEN). The ‘city-break walk’ that I organised as part of the Sociological Review’s Undisciplining conference was an opportunity to explore some of this disconnect between the promotion of the city to visitors and the reality for many residents.

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Being Black At The Polish Seaside

February 2019

In November 2018, FRA (European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights) released a report on ‘Being Black in the EU’. The report analyses the lived experiences of people of African descent and their children in 12 EU Member States: Austria, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Malta, Portugal, Sweden and the United Kingdom, showing that racial discrimination is a common phenomenon across the surveyed countries. Whilst these are popular destinations for African immigrants and account for a long-standing tradition of racialisation, Poland, a less popular destination for African immigrants has a different pattern of racialisation that has been neglected in FRA’s report. It is a pattern of racialisation that I seek to unpack in this piece.

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The Barber Shop

February 2019

The Barber Shop captures the genteel everyday convivialities of life in a male hairdressers. The multicultural neighbourhood in which the film is set has often found itself at the centre of questions about how we live together, typically through a lens that problematises difference. This film steps away from engaging with these questions and focuses instead on the intimacies between barbers and clients developed during and alongside their haircare and personal grooming regimens. Yet in doing so, it disrupts many of the well-worn tropes around race, religion and gender and gives a light-hearted glance at friendship and alternative masculinities.

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