The Sociological Review Blog

#Undisciplining

June 2018

The Sociological Review team is currently in Gateshead, preparing for Undisciplining which commences on Monday with our Early Career Researcher day before the main conference starts on Tuesday. We...

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Book Review: Chinese-British intermarriage by Yang Hu

June 2018

With Chinese-British Intermarriage, Yang Hu makes a highly original contribution to family sociology in general and the study of interethnic intimate relationships in particular. The book focuses on lived experiences of ethnic intermarriage in Chinese-British families in the United Kingdom. Addressing the dearth of in-depth research into everyday practices of interethnic, cross-border and transnational intimate relationships, Chinese-British Intermarriage explores the dynamic construction and constant negotiation of intersecting ethnic and gender identities in Chinese-British interethnic families. The book offers remarkably nuanced insights into the intimate backstage of globalisation by exploring the family lives of an emerging “transnational middle-class”.

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Book Review: Nakedness, Shame, and Embarrassment by Barbara Górnicka

June 2018

Busy being born we enter the sartorial world and have to learn its rules and regulations. For ‘naturists’ this growing up process is slowly unlearned and reversed. In this enjoyable and readable book, Nakedness, Shame, and Embarrassment: A Long-Term Sociological Perspective, Barbara Górnicka explores how it becomes possible for groups of people to socialise whilst naked in public situations without showing any obvious signs of sexual arousal or shame and embarrassment.

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Call for Blog Posts: Sharing is the “new black”? A sociology of the Sharing Economy

May 2018

Since the 2013 cover of The Economist, the hype around “the rise of the sharing economy” has been significant. It has provoked excitement for a new economy based on horizontal collaboration and supported by digital technologies. But it has also generated criticism concerning its implications for society. This is fuelling a debate on the relationship between entrepreneurship and innovation, the re-embeddedness of the economy in society, conceptions of reciprocity, and the apparent failure of communitarian models in favour of extractive models.

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Call for Blog Posts: Populism, People and the Media

May 2018

Political life in the West has become increasingly volatile and polarised. Anger at elites, disillusion with established forms of representation and experience of economic uncertainty has led to a growth of support for populist parties. This resurgence of ‘populism’ – clearly articulated in the 2016 EU referendum and US presidential election – has been attributed, at least in part, both to sensationalist coverage of mainstream news providers and the ‘echo chambers’ of a militant social media. Yet there has been insufficient critical scrutiny and systematic assessment of the relationship between media and populism in the current period.

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