The Sociological Review Blog

Being a Housebound Digital Academic

November 2017

I have been housebound with a chronic health condition (Myalgic Encephalomyelitis, (ME)) since 2008. Yet over the last few years I’ve published three papers and submitted a fourth, given a number of conference talks and reviewed for some top journals. I have even recently started a paid research position, 5 hours per week at the University of Edinburgh in the Centre for Digital Education Research http://www.de.ed.ac.uk/ .

Read more

My Academic Diary: Michaela Benson

November 2017

In this audio academic diary, our Managing Editor Michaela Benson reflects on her fieldwork experiences with the Brexit Brits Abroad project. Carrying out live sociology on such a fast-moving topic poses particular challenges, calling for reflection on the rhythms and routines of our scholarship.

Read more

A small sociology of maternal memory: an interview with Ann Oakley

November 2017

Most sociology has treated women, and the study of women, as a special case. They tend to be confined to special areas - the sociology of gender, the family, feminism - and to special methodological tools, notably indepth 'qualitative' interviewing. This approach has meant that mainstream sociology is ill-equipped to benefit from insights about the experiences of women as human beings. A similar failing has characterised the study of childbirth, which tends to be conceptualised as a feminine medical event.

Read more

Race and Disability in the Academy

November 2017

I have, until recently, worked in disability studies as an accomplice, understanding myself as able-bodied and as someone who does not have physical impairments that impact my daily movement through the world. I have however been diagnosed with a chronic illness that is changing the way I understand myself and is surfacing much internalized ableism. Despite writing and teaching about disability justice, the cultures in which I am embedded make it difficult, even for me, to let go of ableist expectations of my labor and comportment.

Read more

Consider this a Starting Point

November 2017

I have written elsewhere about suffering from chronic pain and the treatment that I underwent during my doctoral studies. As a result of this, I have had the opportunity to read some inspiring and thought-provoking accounts from other writers, and to benefit from their wisdom. I feel very proud to be in the company of these women, but I am also enjoying having a new lease of life, and would like to take this opportunity to explore a different kind of chronic illness in academia.

Read more