Day: March 30, 2019

2016 US Election
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Brexit

Trump, Brexit and the Twilight of Neoliberalism

By Laurence Cox and Alf Gunvald Nilsen Something remarkable has happened in the Anglophone countries where neoliberalism first came to power. After over two decades of popular resistance to trade deals, from the Zapatistas’ 1994 rebellion against NAFTA and the 1999 Seattle WTO summit protest, the US has elected a candidate openly opposed to such […]

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2016 US Election
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Brexit

Does the Election of Donald Trump Signal a Crisis in World Politics?

By Tracy Shildrick For many the vote by the UK to leave the EU was seriously unsettling, if not shocking and even devastating. The election of Donald Trump in the United States was an even bigger international earthquake. Many, included me, are still reeling, trying to process the magnitude of these two important votes and […]

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2016 US Election
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Beacons of Hope and Hate from the US Election: People Power’s Capacity to ‘Trump’ Injustice

By Emma Briant An extreme right fringe has influenced American politics for far longer than many care to admit. This ‘shock’ election victory had a very slow creep. Neoliberal hegemony dug in its heels despite the pain of the 2008 financial crisis, repeating that there is still ‘no alternative’. Even moderate reforms such as Obamacare […]

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2016 US Election
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Love Trumps Hate? LGBTQ in the Trump Era

By Kate McNicholas Smith In a period widely celebrated for its queer progress and inclusion, recent years have seen legislative and social change around LGBT rights. In popular culture we have seen new LGBT visibility and, in perhaps the most iconic symbol of social change, we have seen same-sex marriage legalised or soon to be […]

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2016 US Election
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Trump and The Dangerous Rise of Executive Salvation

By Peter Bloom and Carl Rhodes Donald Trump’s election as President of the United States begs a profoundly paradoxical political question. In an election defined by an intense anger at Wall Street and the neoliberal establishment, how did a silver spoon-fed executive emerge as the champion of those ‘folks who feel left out’ by corporate globalisation […]

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2016 US Election
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Bussing with Trump: Listening to Affect

By Karen Soldatic and Kelley Johnson ‘She got in in the big cities. Look it up! She got in the big cities.’ ‘There is red everywhere! Who would vote for Trump? He is racist and sexist. Who would vote for him? OMG everything is red… look at this!’We turn to the Grade 5s (girls, boys, […]

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2016 US Election
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The Meaning of Donald Trump

By Mark Featherstone Like many people I have spent the last four or five days trying to make sense of the result of the American election. In thinking through the fantastical result I found myself asking two inter-related questions. My first question was, how could Trump win, when Clinton appeared a racing certainty up to […]

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On Goffman: Ethnography and the Ethics of Care

By Michaela Benson Since its publication last year, Alice Goffman’s On the Run has been subject to a growing chorus of scrutiny and scepticism. Important questions have been raised about various aspects of Goffman’s conduct, amidst a wider sea of criticism that some have found excessive. In this post our editorial board member Michaela Bensonargues that […]

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The Referendum in Greece and the Reflexes of Social Scientists

By Melissa Nolas and Christos Varvantakis Rapid Response: Greece, Debt and Europe in Crisis Greece, which has preoccupied the world’s media on and off over the last five years, has once again taken centre stage across media platforms on account of last Sunday’s referendum and the unfolding developments since. There are several reasons behind this […]

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The European Greeks: A Figment of German Imagination?

By Steve Fuller Rapid Response: Greece, Debt and Europe in Crisis To my mind, the most striking features of the public discussion of the Greek debt crisis, including the bailout deal proposed by the EU, are the following: (1) an uncritical reliance on arguments from the power asymmetries between Germany and Greece; (2) a catering […]

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The summer of No (OXI)

By Sarah Green Rapid Response: Greece, Debt and Europe in Crisis Lesvos, 8th July 2015 Everyone is lying. And everyone is telling the truth. That’s the general sense of what’s going on in Greece, in the Eurozone, in the Greek government, and in the Greek opposition to the Greek government. The truth/lies doublespeak is not […]

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The Children of Austerity – debt creates a future of always paying for the past

By Johnna Montgomerie Rapid Response: Greece, Debt and Europe in Crisis Two extraordinary events occurred during the first week of July 2015 that give us a glimpse into our collective future. The Greek people voted ‘no’ to an imposed austerity package and the Greek Prime Minister, Alexis Tsipras, agreed a new package of austerity in […]

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Alternative futures emerging from the debt crisis: the sociological imagination of the Greek ‘OXI’

By Aris Komporozos-Athanasiou Rapid Response: Greece, Debt and Europe in Crisis In the recent referendum of the 5 July 2015, Greek citizens voted to accept or reject proposals from the ‘troika’ of institutions responsible for managing Greek debt (the European Commission, the European Central Bank and the International Monetary Fund). The OXI (‘no’) vote cast […]

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Greek debt crisis: When Sociology does the right thing, for the wrong reason

By Lambros Fatsis Rapid Response: Greece, Debt and Europe in Crisis As the tense cut and thrust thriller of Greece’s financial and political woes still unfolds, albeit with considerably less agony since the Greferendum graduated to an ‘agreekment’, pressing questions about sociology’s currency in handling “the Greek crisis” hover anxiously in the background. The remainder of this article takes […]

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Brexit

A Tale of Two Referenda

By Michaela Benson and Dimitrios Theodossopoulos This time last year, Greece geared up for its referendum on whether to accept the latest bailout offered by the European Union; indignation with the punitive actions of the EU that were holding Greece and its people to ransom fuelled solidarity within the nation-state and support from across Europe, […]

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