Day: January 25, 2019

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Event Reports

Sociology and Social Media: Problems and Prospects

If social media is here to stay, we urgently need to address what this means for the discipline in a way that extends beyond individualised responses which have heretofore been dominant. This event was a first step towards starting this conversation. If you’re interested in continuing the discussions from the event, please contact socialmedia@thesociologicalreview.com with a proposal for […]

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Taking Your PhD out from Under the Bed

I signed up to the Sociological Review’s Writing Retreat early in 2017 in a desperate bid to write up some papers from my PhD that I had hidden, figuratively and literally, under the bed. I had been gripped with an anxiety during my PhD that spilled out from imposter syndrome in the early years into […]

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Chronic Academics

Performing the Disabled Body in Academia

By Luke Walker Since my diagnosis with Crohn’s disease in autumn 2015, the central challenge has been finding ways to perform invisible disability. There is much to say sociologically about a willingness to be seen, yet the semiotics of body politics and performance in favour of being seen has been most explicit in university. The […]

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Academe/Action: Social Transformation Within and Beyond the Academy

By Rosemary Hancock In September of this year the Sociological Review held its inaugural event in Australia, a half-day ECR workshop on social transformation within and beyond the academy, and a public lecture on the same theme. As a student of social movements and grassroots politics the apparent disconnect between the on-the-ground, muddy-hands, embodied nature of […]

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Chronic Academics

Learning and Unlearning Invisibility

By Rose Richards I had a transplant when I was 22. I have now had my kidney for more than half my life and my medical condition is stable. However, it took many years for me to be able to write about or to be able to explore the impact of my invisible medical condition […]

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Chronic Academics

Being a Housebound Digital Academic

By Anna Wood I have been housebound with a chronic health condition (Myalgic Encephalomyelitis, ME) since 2008. Yet over the last few years I’ve published three papers and submitted a fourth, given a number of conference talks and reviewed for some top journals. I have even recently started a paid research position, 5 hours per […]

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Podcasts

My Academic Diary: Michaela Benson

By Michaela Benson In this audio academic diary, our Managing Editor Michaela Benson reflects on her fieldwork experiences with the Brexit Brits Abroad project. Carrying out live sociology on such a fast-moving topic poses particular challenges, calling for reflection on the rhythms and routines of our scholarship. Originally posted 15th November 2017.

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Chronic Academics

The Foundation of a Chronic Academic

By Amarpreet Kaur I made it three months into the first year of my Bachelors degree when a disc in my neck succumbed to the pressure of swelling and prolapsed to compress my spinal cord. I had been diagnosed with a degenerative spinal condition four months earlier, but that was not the anticipated prognosis. My […]

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Interviews

Charitable Giving and Lay Morality

An interview with Balihar Sanghera, author of Charitable Giving and Lay Morality: Understanding Sympathy, Moral Evaluations and Social Positions, shortlisted for The Sociological Review Award for Outstanding Scholarship 2016. What is lay morality? The term is taken from Andrew Sayer’s work, including his book Why Things Matter to People. It refers to our evaluative relation to the world, […]

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The Sociological Review award for Outstanding Scholarship 2016

We are delighted to announce that The Sociological Review award for Outstanding Scholarship 2016 has been awarded to Val Gillies, Rosalind Edwards, Nicola Horsley for their article ‘Brave New Brains: Sociology, Family and the Politics of Knowledge’. This is an important paper with lessons for both the discipline of sociology and for how we conceptualise […]

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A Small Sociology of Maternal Memory: an Interview with Ann Oakley

An interview with Ann Oakley, author of A small sociology of maternal memory, shortlisted for The Sociological Review Award for Outstanding Scholarship 2016. Why have women’s memories of childbirth been treated as special cases by the sociology of memory? Most sociology has treated women, and the study of women, as a special case. They tend to be […]

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Chronic Academics

Race and Disability in the Academy

By Moya Bailey I have, until recently, worked in disability studies as an accomplice, understanding myself as able-bodied and as someone who does not have physical impairments that impact my daily movement through the world. I have however been diagnosed with a chronic illness that is changing the way I understand myself and is surfacing much […]

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Chronic Academics

Consider this a Starting Point

By Elizabeth Bennett I have written elsewhere about suffering from chronic pain and the treatment that I underwent during my doctoral studies. As a result of this, I have had the opportunity to read some inspiring and thought-provoking accounts from other writers, and to benefit from their wisdom. I feel very proud to be in the company of these women, but […]

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Console-ing Passions

By Rachel O’Neill The international feminist media studies conference Console-ing Passions (CP) marked its 25th anniversary this summer with a three-day conference at East Carolina University in Greenville, NC. A crucial swing state, North Carolina voted Republican in the US Presidential Election in November 2016. Earlier the same year, the state legislature passed House Bill 2 — […]

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My Academic Diary: Welcome Week

By Les Back To mark the start of the academic year, we are reproducing Welcome Week from Les Back’s Academic Diary. If you’d like to submit your own academic diary entry, please contact mark@markcarrigan.net. Just a few weeks after graduation the new intake of students arrives for induction or what used to be called ‘Freshers’ and is now […]

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