Day: January 23, 2019

Blog
Chronic Academics

On Good Days, I Am Excited

By Anna Ruddock I am beginning this on a bad day. Not the worst kind of bad day – I am, after all, typing, and therefore thinking, albeit slowly, sludgily. How to describe this? Each time I try, I express it differently. Today it is as though my brain is a cautious thing; a wounded […]

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Blog
Chronic Academics

Making Visible: Chronic Illness and the Academy

By Anna Ruddock Chronically ill academics are not invisible. We are everywhere: as students, teachers, and colleagues. And neither are our illnesses invisible. Not really. Not if you come to know us; if you learn what to look for, to listen for, to ask. Less visible, but insidious and disabling, is the ableism that ensures […]

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Blog

What Works of Sociology and Anthropology Should All Students Read?

What works of Sociology and Anthropology should all students read? Originally posted 8th January 2017.

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Blog

The Double Darkness of Blackness

By Joshua Oware This is the first in a series of guests posts from Joshua Oware (Birkbeck) on blackness and the ontologies of race. The first post explores the uncomfortable, fragile strangeness of black [-ness, trauma, consciousness, and ‘community’]. Recommended accompaniments: Bjork, Dark Matter; and Gil Scott-Heron, Running. * noir (adj.) French – trans.: dark, black le […]

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Blog
Podcasts

Imagining the Past and Future of Community

In this podcast our Digital Fellow Mark Carrigan speaks to Mick Carpenter and Ben Kyneswood about Imagine Hillfields, part of a national project looking at the ways society imagines its present and future: Find out more about this ESRC funded project at its website. Imagine Hillfields is part of a bigger Imagine programme. We’ve also produced a series of […]

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Blog

No Death, No Taxes: A Wake Up Call from Transhumanism

By Emilie Whitaker Saramago’s Death at Intervals depicts a country without death; over seven months the text explores the consequences of death postponed. He tells us of what happens when immortality becomes a lived experience – of those left suspended between life and death, of the crisis of religion and philosophy and a state on the brink […]

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Blog
Event Reports

Writing Retreats as Sites of Resistance, Inclusivity, Self-Care and the Care of Others?

By Carli Ria Rowell Delighted to have been one of sixteen attending The Sociological Review’s writing retreat from a pool of over seventy submissions I arrived at Glasgow central station on the afternoon of September 14th feeling both grateful and excited for what was to come. As a final year doctoral student I have spent […]

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Private Troubles, Public Issues

#CareForTheNHS – Cancer During Our Health Service’s Toughest Season

By Luke Richards I was told I (very probably) had testicular cancer on 12th October 2016. With TC, they don’t really know exactly what kind of tumour (whether it’s dangerous or what type it is etc.) until they, frankly, whip the bollock out and cut into it. So, on that day, I had an ultrasound […]

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archive

Negotiating Employability: Zimbabwean High Skilled Migrants and their Capitals

By Roda Madziva, Juliet Thondhlana, Simon McGrath Migration, settlement and employment in a new country have always been linked strongly to kinship and friendship networks. However, the exact mechanisms operating and their relative importance continue to be a matter of academic debate. Our recently published paper in the Sociological Review: ‘Negotiating employability: migrant capitals and […]

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Event Reports

Reflecting on the Moral Economies of Debt and Punishment

By Chloe Peacock The Value and Values symposium in December provided fascinating insight into a range of research on the relationships between value and values in the realms of the economy, politics and the digital. The symposium opened with a discussion of Bev Skeggs and Simon Yuill’s research on the new form of capitalist culture and new […]

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Blog
Private Troubles, Public Issues

No More Us and Them?

By Steve Hanson The house I was renting in Manchester was a tiny damp end terrace. I had viewed the place in summer and it seemed fine. It had been the home of an elderly lady until she was unable to cope. The ancient storage heaters stopped working just as the cold kicked in, mid-November, […]

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Blog

The Other Davos: A Sociologist Goes to the World Economic Forum

By Evelyn Ruppert We are so proud and inspired. In the current political context President Xi is the one promoting openness, not building walls, swimming with others in the ocean and not assuming you can swim the other way. All of this she said to me in relation to Trump, the isolationist, nationalist, self-interested and […]

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Essays

A Salute to the ‘Exegetical Giddens’: Durkheim scholar

By Matt Dawson This article is part of our Past and present series, in which current scholars look back at earlier works published in the journal. There is an old joke, once given an outing in The Sociological Review (SR), that there must be more than one Anthony Giddens. How else to explain the publishing phenomenon that […]

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Blog

If a Sociologist Makes a Discovery in the Forest but There’s No One to Notice, Does It Still Count?

By Stephen Mugford A while back I heard a podcast from the BBC. It featured interviews with younger, social science researchers on recent findings about illicit drug use(rs), all of which I’d heard before or even ‘discovered’ myself. This elicited my inner ‘grumpy old man’ suggesting to me the acerbic phrase ‘the eternal sunshine of […]

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Blog

Life Methods

By Des Fitzgerald Panic on the streets of Swansea In May 2016, in its online ‘Cities’ section, the Guardian reported on a survey about the rate of panic attacks in a range of different UK cities. The article partly caught my eye because, according to the survey, South Wales (where I live!) is the most […]

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