Day: January 22, 2019

Podcasts

Podcast: Nihilism and Urban Multiculture in Outer East London

In this podcast Malcolm James, Lecturer in Media and Cultural Studies at Sussex University, discusses his recent paper in The Sociological Review on the discourse of nihilism as it has emerged in relation to urban multiculture in London. He’s just published a book on this topic: Urban Multiculture.  Originally posted 3rd January 2016.

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Podcasts

Podcast: Gender and Creative Labour

In this podcast Bridget Conor, Rosalind Gill and Stephanie Taylor discuss their new monograph on Gender and Creative Labour with our digital fellow Mark Carrigan. Their collection explores the paradox presented by the creative industries: ‘cool, creative and egalitarian’ on the one hand, riven by inequalities of class and gender on the other. See here for the full contents of the monograph. Originally posted […]

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Podcasts

The Accelerated Academy

In recent years, a rich vein of criticism has emerged concerning the speeding up of higher education and the possible virtues of slow scholarship as a response to this. We’re very pleased to now share podcasts from the Accelerated Academy conference organised by Mark Carrigan and Filip Vostal itself:  Originally posted 5th February 2016.

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Essays

The Monarchy: Pomp, Ceremony and Soap Opera

By Jim McGuigan This article is part of our Past and present series, in which current scholars look back at earlier works published in the journal. ‘The Meaning of the Coronation’ by Edward Shils and Michael Young was one of the first papers to appear in the New Series of The Sociological Review which, like the Queen, […]

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Life Chances: Co-written Re-imagined Welfare Utopias through a Fictional Novel

Debbie Watson, Simon Poulter, Sophie Mellor and Marilyn Howard In the fourth part of our special section on Sociology and Fiction, Debbie Watson, Simon Poulter, Sophie Mellor and Marilyn Howard reflect on their ‘Life Chances’ project: the co-development of a fictional novel with community participants. ‘Life Chances’, a phrase first used by sociologist Max Weber, has been appropriated by recent British […]

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Videocasts

University: A New Way of Life

Bruce Bennett and Brian Baker A film by Brian Baker and Bruce Bennett. Voiceover by John Schad. ‘The university is a critical institution or it is nothing’ (Stuart Hall) The UK government’s publication in March 2015 of a ‘Consumer Rights Guide’ for undergraduate students is an indication that the transformation of British universities from public institutions to privatized institutions […]

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Podcasts

Let Me Stay: Housing Insecurity in the UK

In the next instalment of our series of cultural podcasts, our Digital Fellow Mark Carrigan talked to Glasgow artist Penny Anderson about her exhibition Let Me Stay, organised with Dan Silver from the Social Action & Research Foundation. The exhibition will be held at Manchester Creative Studio, 16 Blossom St, Manchester, M4 5AW (please use the entrance on Henry […]

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Podcasts

Patricia Leavy on Social Fictions

In the fifth part of our special section on Sociology and Fiction, Patricia Leavy talks to our Digital Fellow Mark Carrigan about sociological writing and her work on social fictions. Originally posted 27th March 2016.

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Liars, Damn Liars, and Sociologists

By Erynn Masi de Casanova In the sixth part of our special section on Sociology and Fiction, Erynn Masi de Casanova reflects on the fictional aspect inherent in social research and how we might negotiate it in a creative and helpful way. We like to draw firm boundaries around things. A bold line usually separates fiction writing and […]

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Consultation As Co-Option: Negotiating A Post-Public University System

By John Holmwood Neo-liberal governance operates through the co-production of its policy objectives. This frequently takes place through consultation with ‘stakeholders’. Of course, those stakeholders are differentially affected by proposed policies and have interests at stake. Consultation might appear to be an evidence-based process with consensus as its aim, but, in truth, interests are not […]

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Some Thoughts on ‘Sociological Fiction’

By Ashleigh Watson In the seventh part of our special section on Sociology and Fiction, Ashleigh Watson reflects on the unusual status of her doctoral research and addresses the theoretical questions posed by a project which is both fiction and sociology.  Sociology has a long, well-documented history. Developing through the Enlightenment, the Scientific and Industrial Revolutions, and Romantic and […]

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Academic Celebrity and the Publishing Industry

By Peter Walsh In the first article of our special section on Superstar Professors, Peter Walsh argues that the brand value of celebrity academics has to be understood in terms of longer term trends in scholarly publishing.  In March 2014, I discovered that Zygmunt Bauman – regarded by many as the world’s greatest sociologist – had written […]

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Event Reports

Global Societies: Fragmenting and Connecting

By Rebecca Fish In 2015/16 we ran our conference funding for Early Career Researchers scheme for the second time. In this series of posts, some of the winners report from the conferences they attended with our support.  As an early career researcher, I was extremely fortunate that the Sociological Review agreed to fund my trip to Birmingham’s […]

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Brexit

Brexit as a Problem for the Sociology of Culture

By Dave O’Brien and Mark Taylor British social science is currently responding to the puzzle of contemporary political events. Most obviously this takes the form of thinking through the vote to leave the EU and the associated rise of reactionary sentiment. There has also been, understandably, a quest to think about the role of social science more generally, in relation […]

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Absent Experts and Public Debates About Integration

By Ben Gidley Stephen Kinnock MP recently found himself in the midst of a social media controversy after declaring at a Progress conference that “We must move away from multiculturalism and towards assimilation”. While the demand to move away from multiculturalism (a policy Britain has never really adopted at a national level anyway) is hardly original, the […]

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