Day: January 21, 2019

Blog
Brexit
Essays

Brexit London: the past, present and future of racism in the capital

By Malcolm James On 23rd June 2016, the United Kingdom voted by referendum to leave the European Union. Viewed as the great tragedy of Boris Johnson’s elitism, it can also be attributed to at least a century of xeno-racism nurtured by successive Labour and Conservative governments. If Brexit was in part the consequence of decades […]

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Blog

The Rise of the Trump Academic

By Liz Morrish A recent post by Mark Carrigan caught my imagination, about ‘networking’ with its usual connotations of “insincerity, instrumentalism and general creepiness”. We can all recognise the ambitious researcher at the conference who is anxious to advertise their own work while affecting interest in the keynote speaker’s presentation. It resonates with my current work on […]

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Blog
Podcasts

Why We Need To Understand Riots

In this podcast our Digital Fellow Mark Carrigan speaks to Joshua Clover about his new book Riot. Strike. Riot: The Era of Uprisings. Recorded to coincide with the fifth anniversary of the English riots, the discussion explores the nature of riots and their significance within the broader operations of capitalism. Originally posted 7th September 2016.

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Blog

Scholarship, and beyond … Sociology in the 21st century

By Graham Scambler When commenting on the challenges confronting sociologists and their allies in this harsh, austere and topsy-turvy era of financial capitalism it is only too easy to overlook very real talent and accomplishment. So let me begin this brief offering by celebrating sociology’s young, committed, creative and often battered if stoical practitioners. If […]

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archive

Centuries of Sociology in Millions of Books

By Yunsong Chen and Fei Yan Sociology, as one of the core disciplines of the social sciences, is “like a caravansary on the Silk Road, filled with all sorts and types of people and beset by bandit gangs of positivists, feminists, interactionists, and Marxists, and even by some larger, far-off states like Economics and the Humanities, […]

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Blog
Event Reports

The Unbearable Lightness of Whiteness

By Elizaveta Gaufman Elizaveta Gaufman reflects on our recent Early Career Researcher Master Class with Éric Fassin The Sociological Review Foundation and Goldsmiths University hosted a wonderful event for early career researchers – master class with Professor Éric Fassin (Université Paris-8). The master class united a group of researchers who dealt with the topic of gender […]

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Podcasts

Biosocial Matters: Rethinking the Sociology-Biology Relations in the Twenty-First Century

Following the launch of our most recent monograph, Biosocial Matters, our Digital Fellow Mark Carrigan spoke to joint editor Maurizio Meloni about the transformation of the relationship between Sociology and Biology and what this means for the social sciences and social life more broadly. Originally posted 15th June 2016.

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Blog

My Academic Diary: Sadia Habib

Sadia HabibDoctoral ResearcherDepartment of EducationGoldsmiths, University of London Pre – Submission – Tuesday 3rd May In the week leading up to submission, I was as relaxed as one can be, as I had paced my final edits over the last few weeks.  Now quite tired of reading the material over and over again (although I […]

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Reviews

Book Review: Shell Shocked: The Social Response to Terrorist Attacks by Gérôme Truc

Review by Dr Anne Eyre Gérôme Truc is a sociologist and tenured research fellow at the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), and member of the Institut des Sciences sociales du Politique, based at the University Paris Nanterre and the ENS Paris-Saclay. His work focuses primarily on social reactions to terrorist attacks and their memorialisation, and more generally on […]

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Reviews

Book Review: Invisible Britain edited by Paul Sng

Review by Kate Haddow Paul Sng is a filmmaker and writer of dual British and Singaporean heritage whose work focuses on people who challenge the status quo. In 2015 he founded Velvet Joy Productions to explore the lives and work of individuals who have been neglected, marginalised or misrepresented by mainstream media. His first feature […]

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Reviews

Book Review: Welfare Words by Paul Michael Garrett

Review by Ian Cummins Paul Michael Garrett works at NUI Galway in the Republic of Ireland. In 2018 he was Visiting Professor at the City University of New York (CUNY). Contemporary neoliberalism and historical practices of marginalisation and domination are some of his key scholarly concerns. For over ten years, he has been a member […]

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