Day: December 4, 2018

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Blog
Event Reports

Exceptionalising Intersectionality in Texts for Domestic Abuse Survivors

In 2015/16 we ran our conference funding for Early Career Researchers scheme for the second time. In this series of posts, some of the winners report from the conferences they attended with our support.  By Abigaël Candelas de la Ossa In May, I attended the International Gender and Language Association (IGALA 9) conference in Hong Kong to speak […]

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Interviews

Habitus and Social Science: a Virtual Roundtable

Following our ground-breaking special section on the habitus beyond sociology, published in February this year, we invited some of the contributors to undertake a dialogue for our blog. Elizabeth B. Silva, Helene Aarseth, Sam Friedman, Lynne Layton and Muriel Darmon discuss some of the key issues addressed in the special section. Why is the habitus an important concept for the social sciences? Elizabeth: The […]

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Blog
Event Reports

Visual Research Methods and Visual Ethnographies

In 2015/16 we ran our conference funding for Early Career Researchers scheme for the second time. In this series of posts, some of the winners report from the conferences they attended with our support.  By Abigail Hackett Whilst interest and enthusiasm for the visual within research methods is increasing, the field remains fragmented and multi-disciplinary, drawing on diverse epistemologies […]

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Event Reports

Discussing the “refugee crisis” at the 21st ASN Convention

In 2015/16 we ran our conference funding for Early Career Researchers scheme for the second time. In this series of posts, some of the winners report from the conferences they attended with our support.  By Marco Mogiani In October 2015, I had just come back to London after having carried out my fieldwork in Greece. Throughout the 10 […]

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Blog
Event Reports

Is It a Bird? Is It a Plane? No, It’s SUPERPROFESSOR!!!

In the second article of our special section on Superstar Professors, Jonathan Rees reflects on the relationship between Massive Open Online Courses and the rise of the academic celebrity.  By Jonathan Rees I first saw the word “superprofessor” in an article at some conservative website.  I lost track of the link a long time ago, but I know it […]

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Blog

The Coming of the Distracted Scholar?

By Filip Vostal Several accounts – relying on different assumptions and often rigorous methodologies – recently put forth the claim that scientific outputs are growing exponentially. This tendency has been documented in economics, which generates a new journal article every 25 minutes. In the natural, medical and health sciences, global scientific output doubles every 9 years […]

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Blog

Searching for a Sociological Sensibility

By Keith Kahn-Harris In a post on the Sociological Imagination blog, in the context of discussing my experiences as a sociologist working partly-in and partly-out of academia, I raised the following questions: Is there a sociological sensibility whose presence can make someone a sociologist without reference to what other sociologists write? Is there a bedrock on which […]

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Event Reports

Communicative <3 Intimacies: Influencers and Perceived Interconnectedness

In 2015/16 we ran our conference funding for Early Career Researchers scheme for the second time. In this series of posts, some of the winners report from the conferences they attended with our support. By Crystal Abidin Towards the end of my PhD candidature, I started seeking out conference opportunities to fill the transient lull post-thesis submission and […]

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archive
Blog

Do We Need Academic Celebrities?

By Jana Bacevic Why do we need academic celebrities? In this post, I would like to extend the discussion of academic celebrities from the focus on these intellectuals’ strategies, or ‘acts of positioning’, to what makes them possible in the first place, in the sense of Kant’s ‘conditions of possibility’. In other words, I want […]

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Blog

Sociological Questions Through the Spectre of Brexit

By Chris Moreh The Conservative Party victory in the 2015 general elections on a pledge to hold a Referendum on the United Kingdom’s EU membership raised immediate questions about the possible sociological consequences of an eventual popular decision to leave the European Union. Such questions became increasingly more pertinent as the referendum date was set […]

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Blog

A Short Story of How I Started Writing My Way Back from Fieldwork

In 2015/16 we ran our conference funding for Early Career Researchers scheme for the second time. In this series of posts, some of the winners report from the conferences they attended with our support. By Tatiana Sanchez Parra The last stage of my six month period of fieldwork in Colombia was shaped by a series of emotions, […]

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Blog

Could universities learn from the TEF’s advocates how better to influence public discourses?

By Steven Jones, Steven Courtney & Ruth McGinity The Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) is no easy sell. For a sector already awash with audits, metrics and league tables, the prospect of new measurements – especially ones underpinned by a brazenly market-driven ideology – is difficult to embrace. The ways in which the TEF is discursively […]

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Blog
Essays

The Higher Education White Paper: Euphemisms for Destruction

By William Davies There’s a film clip of Le Corbusier in 1925 outlining his Plan Voisin for Paris. The great architect stands over his design gesturing manically to the sweeping modernist vision outlined in front of him. Out go historical streets and emergent neighbourhoods for which central Paris is widely known and loved. In comes a vast […]

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Blog
Event Reports

What Does Heritage Change?

In 2015/16 we ran our conference funding for Early Career Researchers scheme for the second time. In this series of posts, some of the winners report from the conferences they attended with our support. By Nuala Morse The Association of Critical Heritage Studies (ACHS) is a relatively new association which takes shape around its biennial conference. Montreal hosted […]

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Blog

Political Participation on Both Sides of the Pond

In 2015/16 we ran our conference funding for Early Career Researchers scheme for the second time. In this series of posts, some of the winners report from the conferences they attended with our support. By Jakob Hartl The Sociological Review Foundation allowed me to attend two conferences in the USA and Canada in June 2016. Although more or […]

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