Day: December 3, 2018

Blog

From margin to centre? Feminist Political Economy and International Relations at the 9th Pan-European Conference on International Relations in Giardini Naxos, Sicily

In 2014 we ran our conference funding for Early Career Researchers scheme for the first time. In this series of posts, some of the winners report from the conferences they attended with our support.  By Sydney Calkin The European International Studies Association (EISA) Conference took place in Giardini Naxos, Sicily from 23-27 September 2015. This […]

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Blog

On Academic Celebrity

By Peter W. Walsh Research on celebrity is growing fast. In English-language publications since 2000, the phenomenon has attracted several books of scholarly analysis and a dedicated journal, Celebrity Studies. However, in all this research, one form of celebrity has been unjustly neglected: celebrity within academia. As few as two sociology articles have tried to explain the […]

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Reflective Methodologies at the 9th Pan-European Conference

In 2014 we ran our conference funding for Early Career Researchers scheme for the first time. In this series of posts, some of the winners report from the conferences they attended with our support.  By Gillian McFadyen The end of September normally sees academics preparing for the start of the new academic year, organising teaching, […]

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Podcasts

Sociology As Court Poetry

By Les Back Special Section on Future Sociologies In this podcast Les Back, Professor of Sociology at Goldsmiths, reflects on the Future Sociologies event which took place at the University of Leeds in July 2015. He argues that the discipline risks becoming ‘court poetry’, as the pressure to demonstrate impact by narrow criteria inculcates a similarly narrow orientation […]

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Blog

How Sociologists Work

We asked our Twitter followers if they were willing to share pictures of the desks where they worked. We’ve attached a few of their responses below. There’s many more though and people are still sharing them using the hashtag #sociologicaldesk. While this could be seen as an example of Twitter’s triviality, we think it’s more interesting […]

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Interviews

Getting Beyond Bourdieu in the Sociology of Morality

In recent years morality and ethics have returned to the mainstream of Sociology after a long period relegated to the periphery of the discipline. In this interview, following from her recent paper in The Sociological Review, Léna Pellandini-Simányi, Assistant Professor at Eötvös Loránd University, puts these trends in context and offers a nuanced critique of Pierre Bourdieu’s […]

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Towards a Philosophical Sociology

By Daniel Chernilo In this special series for The Sociological Review website, innovative sociologists reflect on the challenges and opportunities facing the discipline today. In the fourth essay, Daniel Chernilo, Reader in Social and Political Thought at Loughborough University, considers the tacit philosophical underpinnings of social life and calls for a Philosophical Sociology capable of reclaiming them.  […]

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Interviews

What is the habitus clivé?

By Sam Friedman While habitus is surely one of the most influential concepts in Sociology today, the related idea of the habitus clivé is less well known. Our editorial board member Sam Friedman, London School of Economics, explains where this concept came from and how his recent research, published in The Sociological Review, indicates that it […]

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Campus Politics, Student Societies and Social Media

By Samuel Burgum While the Students Union is seen as a key site through which students are drawn into political activism, it has often be less clear precisely how this milieu facilitates the development of norms and encourages collective action. Sam Burgum reflects on a recent paper he co-authored with Brian D. Loader, Ariadne Vromen, Michael A. Xenos […]

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Interviews

Working Life Coaching and the Individualization of Class

By Katariina Mäkinen What is working life coaching? What can its growth tell us about the individualization of class? These were the questions addressed by Katariina Mäkinen (University of Helsinki) in a recent paper for The Sociological Review. In this interview, she introduces this work and explains why working life coaching is so significant for life under […]

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Essays

It’s Not Something You Can Just Share on Facebook. On the Difficulty of Talking About Childhood Sexual Abuse

By Maggie Studholme ‘Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one must be silent’ Wittgenstein, Tractatus 7 I have found it almost overwhelmingly difficult to write/speak the sentence ‘I was sexually abused as a child’. But why, in a societal atmosphere in which ‘abuse’ now makes frequent appearances in the mainstream media, and in which others have also begun […]

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Reviewing Sociological Fiction

By Ashleigh Watson How Should We Review Sociological Fiction? ‘How’ is always contextual. Reviewing fiction, like reviewing abstracts for conferences and articles for publication, is done according to relative criteria. The quality of the writing is always a primary focus. The ways we understand that quality depends on various things: why it was written, who […]

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Veiled Concerns: the Faux Feminism of Far Right Populism

By Naaz Rashid Boris Johnson’s racist statements about Muslim women join an ever expanding back-catalogue of political gaffes. But as others and I have argued his comments represent part of a broader populist project. Populism, as a term has been used since the late 19th century and has been used to define various political movements. In 2004, […]

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Videocasts

Welcome to Undisciplining: Celebrating the Sociological

The Sociological Review aims to foster collaborations and dialogues across disciplines and beyond academia in order to shape the nature and scope of the sociological. Our conference Undisciplining sought to challenge the presumed mainstream of sociological thought, its geographical assumptions and disciplinary hierarchies. This opening session brought together our editorial team to discuss The Sociological Review’s past, […]

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Essays

Organised State Abandonment: The Meaning of Grenfell

By Brenna Bhandar “My family were survivors of life, yeah? This is not the only traumatic thing that’s happened to us that’s been on the news, et cetera, yeah? And we’re fighters naturally, yeah? So who do you argue with? Who do I argue with? This has been my stress this year, this has made […]

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